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NJSHA Profile

What is NJSHA? 

The New Jersey Speech-Language Hearing Association (NJSHA) is an organization of New Jersey professionals working in the fields of speech pathology and audiology. The majority of members are certified or licensed and have Master’s or Doctoral degrees.

What is NJSHA’s mission? 

NJSHA serves professionals in the fields of audiology and speech-language pathology. NJSHA establishes and promotes high ethical and professional standards and provides programs and services that meet members' needs. NJSHA also advocates for services provided to people by audiology and speech-language pathology professionals.

Who are NJSHA members?

Speech-Language Pathologists, Speech-Language Specialists
Teachers of the Communication Impaired and Teachers of the Hearing Impaired
Audiologists
Students 
Affiliated Professionals

Where do NJSHA members work?

53% of the membership work in Public or Private Schools
10% of the membership work in Clinical Settings (Hospital or Agency) 
16% of the membership work in Private Practices 
3% of the membership work at Colleges/Universities 
10% of the membership work in Other Settings 
8% of the membership are Students

What do Speech-Language Pathologists and Speech-Language Specialists do? 

Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) help people of all ages deal with a variety of speech, language and learning difficulties. SLPs work in clinics, hospitals, schools, private practice and other settings, evaluating and providing therapy for a full range of communication disorders. For example, they often help children with autism, cerebral palsy and other developmental delays. They might help survivors of brain injuries or strokes regain lost language and speech. SLPs can also evaluate and treat a variety of feeding and swallowing disorders from infancy through geriatrics. They might help those who stutter to increase their fluency or help children and adolescents with language disorders and learning difficulties express themselves more effectively. SLPs who work in schools are also known as Speech-Language Specialists.

What do Audiologists do? 

Audiologists help people of all ages who have hearing or auditory processing problems by measuring hearing ability, identifying disorders and providing rehabilitative services. They assess the need for amplification devices and instruct in their care, and serve as consultants to government and industry on issues concerning environmental, noise-induced hearing loss.

2015 New Jersey Speech-Language-Hearing Association | All rights reserved.