Although we couldn’t hold the Annual Convention in April 2020, our Continuing Education and Convention Committees worked hard to line up nationally recognized presenters and hot topics for our Virtual Mini Convention!

Three tracks of topics (three two-hour presentations in each track) were aired live in August. They were recorded and are now available for on-demand viewing through December 15, 2020.

You can purchase one, two or all three tracks for viewing, for a total of 18 continuing education hours.

The more you sign up for the more you save!
Select the track you would like to purchase.
Interested in more than one track? Purchase a second track and get a discount!

 

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Online Registration (with a credit card):
Register for the Multicultural Track
NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.
 
Register for the Apraxia Track
NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.
 
Register for the Telepractice Track
NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.

Multicultural Track

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by Valerie E. Johnson, PhD, CCC-SLP

Dr. Valerie Johnson received her bachelor of science and master of science degrees in speech-language pathology (SLP) from Florida State University and her PhD in communication sciences and disorders from the University of Massachusetts. As a doctoral student at University of Massachusetts, she worked with Drs. Harry Seymour, Jill de Villiers and Tom Roeper in the development of the Diagnostic Evaluation of Language Variation (DELV).

Currently, Dr. Johnson is an assistant professor and the Founding Program Director for the newly developed SLP program at Rutgers University in Newark. Her current research examines language acquisition and its disorders in the context of dialect variation and methods to reduce cultural and linguistic bases within SLP assessments of children who speak African American English.

Abstract

Over the past 20 years there has been a considerable amount of research published on understanding African American English (AAE) use in children (Stockman, 2010). This research focused on describing normal language development in AAE-speaking children (e.g., Koonce, 2015; Newkirk, Oetting, & Stockman, 2016); examining biases in norm-referenced assessment tools (e.g., Cole &Taylor, 1990); differentiating dialect from disordered language behaviors (e.g., Seymour, Bland-Stewart, and Green 1998; Washington & Craig, 2000); bi-dialectal proficiency and teaching MAE to AAE speakers (e.g., Edwards & Rosin, 2017); and examination of the possible link between children’s use of AAE and poor literacy outcomes (e.g., Charity and Scarborough, & Griffin, 2004). The themes or topics examined in the literature on children’s use of AAE has not really changed much from the 1970s. What has changed, however, seems to be a consistent movement away from more pluralistic models of understanding the relationship between children’s language behaviors and the assessment of their educational outcomes (Smitherman, 1998). This is relevant to SLPs given the historical nature of our field’s practices to readily identify speakers of AAE as having a communication disorder in need of remediation (Van Keulen, Weddington, & DeBose, 1998). Despite a larger literature base on normal language development of AAE speakers and the guidelines from the ASHA position statement (1983) and technical reports (2003) related to dialect use, SLPs continue to struggle with the assessment and treatment in African American children. The use of culturally responsive frameworks to guide research and clinical practice will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Discuss the literature describing the normal communication behaviors of children who use AAE and its implications for assessment.
      • Discuss the importance of considering historical context in the development of the ASHA position statements and technical reports.
      • Explain how culturally responsive frameworks might help SLPs engage in effective practices during service delivery to children who use AAE.

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 5 Minutes – Introduction
      • 25 Minutes – Background
        • Description of AAE
        • Clinical Conundrum
      • 30 Minutes – Trends in Research
        • Assessment and AAE
        • Dialect Density and AAE
      • 45 Minutes – Time for a Change
        • New Direction for Assessment
        • New Framework for Research
      • 15 Minutes – Questions and Answers

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional area).

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by Valerie E. Johnson, PhD, CCC-SLP

Dr. Valerie Johnson received her bachelor of science and master of science degrees in speech-language pathology (SLP) from Florida State University and her PhD in communication sciences and disorders from the University of Massachusetts. As a doctoral student at University of Massachusetts, she worked with Drs. Harry Seymour, Jill de Villiers and Tom Roeper in the development of the Diagnostic Evaluation of Language Variation (DELV).

Currently, Dr. Johnson is an assistant professor and the Founding Program Director for the newly developed SLP program at Rutgers University in Newark. Her current research examines language acquisition and its disorders in the context of dialect variation and methods to reduce cultural and linguistic bases within SLP assessments of children who speak African American English.

Abstract

ASHA’s 2019 Membership and Affiliate Professional Profile reports that only 8.3 percent of the total membership identify as racial minorities. This statistic has far reaching implications – from undergraduate and graduate recruitment, student retention, research and client outcomes. This is an introductory session that will examine implications and strategies to improve diversity and equity within our field.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Describe the difference between diversity and equity.
      • Describe how poor minority representation in the profession impacts clinical outcomes.
      • Identify strategies they can implement to improve diversity and equity in the workplace.

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 5 Minutes – Introduction
      • 10 Minutes – Diversity vs. Equity
      • 30 Minutes – The Pipeline
        • Importance of the Pipeline
        • Student Recruitment and Retention
        • Review of the Data
          • Undergraduate
          • Graduate
          • Doctorate
      • 20 Minutes – Cultural Competence in Clinical Settings
      • 15 Minutes – Equity in Research
      • 25 Minutes – Strategies for Improving Equity in the Profession
        • Academics
          • Recruitment, Admissions and Retention
          • Curriculum (Re)Development
      • 15 Minutes – Question and Answers

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Introductory level; Professional area).

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by José G. Centeno, PhD, CCC-SLP

Dr. José G. Centeno, professor, Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences, Rutgers School of Health Professions, Newark, New Jersey, conducts research in monolingual Spanish/bilingual Spanish-English speakers with aphasia and service delivery to multiethnic communicatively-impaired adult neurorehabilitation caseloads. Dr. Centeno has participated in national and international professional committees in multicultural issues.

Abstract

The interaction of increasing stroke prevalence due to global population aging with improved stroke survival and steady growth in international migration is estimated to expand multiethnic geriatric populations with chronic post-stroke aphasia worldwide. Regarding the United States, a top host of international migrants, ethnic minorities will approximate 42 percent of the 65-year-and-over population in 2050 (FIFA, 2012). Many of these individuals are bilingual, as suggested by estimates of 78 percent (47 million) minority-language speakers that use English well (US Census Bureau, 2013). With stroke survivors expected to number 3.4 million by 2030 (Obviagele et al., 2013) and individuals with post-stroke aphasia to approximate 100,000 new cases a year in the US (Ellis & Urban, 2016; Norise & Hamilton, 2017), large multiethnic-multilingual aphasia caseloads are projected in US neurorehabilitation programs (Centeno, 2019).

Despite the steady growth in multiethnic-multilingual stroke groups in the US, SLPs serving bi/multilingual aphasia caseloads frequently experience conceptual and clinical challenges due to training and resource limitations (Centeno, 2009; 2015). This presentation will provide a principled framework to serve bi/multilingual individuals with aphasia. We will start with an overview of global and national demographic and epidemiological trends relevant to ethnogeriatric stroke groups, and continue with foundational knowledge that enhances accuracy in aphasia assessment in bi/multilingual adults. We will follow with an assessment protocol and conclude with plausible person-centered, evidence-based intervention strategies to facilitate linguistic recovery, minimize the extent of the disability, and promote social functioning in bi/multilingual persons with post-stroke aphasia (Centeno, 2007; Centeno et al., 2017; World Health Organization, 2001).

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Discuss world and local demographic and epidemiological stroke factors pertinent to aphasia management in multiethnic-multilingual adult populations.
      • Explain the relevance of sociocultural, acquisitional, and neurolinguistic variables in the assessment of bi/multilingual persons with aphasia.
      • Explain the connection between a bilingual aphasia profile and the client’s sociocultural, acquisitional, and neurolinguistic background.
      • Discuss the crucial variables needed to design ecologically valid, evidence-based personalized intervention strategies for bilingual/multilingual persons with aphasia

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 15 Minutes – Multiethnic-multilingual stroke populations: Demographic and epidemiological trends
      • 30 Minutes – Sociocultural, acquisitional, and neurolinguistic factors in aphasia management in bi/multilingual persons
      • 30 Minutes – Aphasia assessment of bi/multilingual speakers
      • 5 Minutes – Questions and Answers
      • 30 Minutes – Ecologically valid, evidence-based personalized intervention strategies for bi/multilingual persons with aphasia
      • 10 Minutes – Questions and Answers

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional area).

Apraxia Track

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP

Julie Hoffmann is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Saint Louis University (SLU). She has been on the faculty at SLU for 26 years and teaches courses in Phonetics and Speech Sound Disorders. She is a clinical instructor in the SLU clinic teaching graduate students diagnostics and treatment for a variety of clients. Ms. Hoffmann has given numerous presentations and workshops in her areas of specialization, including: childhood apraxia of speech; phonological disorders; children who are non-verbal/lack imitative skills; and treatment of R, interdental & lateral lisps. She has a private practice in Columbia, Illinois providing treatment for children and adolescents. She recently has completed numerous teletherapy sessions with children via Zoom. Julie has a passion for helping children find their voices!

Abstract

Treating childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) can be challenging for many speech-language pathologists (SLPs), so understanding results of current CAS treatment research as well as learning how to implement treatment approaches is important. By comparing CAS, phonology and dysarthria and their therapy methods, SLPs will have numerous approaches and techniques at their fingertips to best help clients with CAS. Discussion of automaticity, flexibility, motor performance and motor learning as related to CAS therapy will be explained. Several effective CAS treatment approaches identified as beneficial on ASHA’s Practice Portal will be discussed. What does best treatment look like for the child with CAS who is speaking, yet highly unintelligible? For the child who is very young with Suspected CAS with minimal verbalizations? For the adolescent with residual CAS issues? How do you choose target sounds and contexts for children with CAS? How do you teach a child to imitate syllables and words who does not imitate? How do you improve vowel errors? How do you make the necessary “drill” for CAS engaging? CAS is a complex motor speech disorder which requires further client analysis and solid therapy decision making in order to expedite progress. Video of complex cases will be incorporated throughout the presentation to increase understanding of methods discussed.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Differentially diagnose and recognize key diagnostic indicators of CAS, sCAS, Dysarthria & Phonological Disorder as related to young children.
      • Identify components of a full speech assessment for children with CAS and sCAS.
      • Describe motor learning principles and treatment approaches to help clients “motor learn” related to CAS treatment research.
      • Describe therapy methods for very young children with Suspected CAS
      • Apply vowel knowledge when treating vowels in syllables and words of children with CAS

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 30 Minutes – Comparison of CAS, sCAS, Dysarthria and Phonological Disorders
      • 30 Minutes – Assessment overview to help with CAS therapy planning
      • 60 Minutes – Use of Motor Learning Principles for CAS Therapy Approaches

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional area).

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP

Julie Hoffmann is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Saint Louis University (SLU). She has been on the faculty at SLU for 26 years and teaches courses in Phonetics and Speech Sound Disorders. She is a clinical instructor in the SLU clinic teaching graduate students diagnostics and treatment for a variety of clients. Ms. Hoffmann has given numerous presentations and workshops in her areas of specialization, including: childhood apraxia of speech; phonological disorders; children who are non-verbal/lack imitative skills; and treatment of R, interdental & lateral lisps. She has a private practice in Columbia, Illinois providing treatment for children and adolescents. She recently has completed numerous teletherapy sessions with children via Zoom. Julie has a passion for helping children find their voices!

Abstract

Treating childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) can be challenging for many speech-language pathologists (SLPs), so understanding results of current CAS treatment research as well as learning how to implement treatment approaches is important. By comparing CAS, phonology and dysarthria and their therapy methods, SLPs will have numerous approaches and techniques at their fingertips to best help clients with CAS. Discussion of automaticity, flexibility, motor performance and motor learning as related to CAS therapy will be explained. Several effective CAS treatment approaches identified as beneficial on ASHA’s Practice Portal will be discussed. What does best treatment look like for the child with CAS who is speaking, yet highly unintelligible? For the child who is very young with Suspected CAS with minimal verbalizations? For the adolescent with residual CAS issues? How do you choose target sounds and contexts for children with CAS? How do you teach a child to imitate syllables and words who does not imitate? How do you improve vowel errors? How do you make the necessary “drill” for CAS engaging? CAS is a complex motor speech disorder which requires further client analysis and solid therapy decision making in order to expedite progress. Video of complex cases will be incorporated throughout the presentation to increase understanding of methods discussed.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Differentially diagnose and recognize key diagnostic indicators of CAS, sCAS, Dysarthria & Phonological Disorder as related to young children.
      • Identify components of a full speech assessment for children with CAS and sCAS. .
      • Describe motor learning principles and treatment approaches to help clients “motor learn” related to CAS treatment research.
      • Describe therapy methods for very young children with Suspected CAS
      • Apply vowel knowledge when treating vowels in syllables and words of children with CAS

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 30 Minutes – Treatment of young children with sCAS
      • 30 Minutes – Best therapy cues to use in CAS treatment (Multisyllabic words, suprasegmentals, oral motor tasks, etc. )
      • 30 Minutes – Vowel therapy
      • 20 Minutes – CAS resources and materials

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional area).

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by Julie Hoffmann, MA, CCC-SLP

Julie Hoffmann is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Saint Louis University (SLU). She has been on the faculty at SLU for 26 years and teaches courses in Phonetics and Speech Sound Disorders. She is a clinical instructor in the SLU clinic teaching graduate students diagnostics and treatment for a variety of clients. Ms. Hoffmann has given numerous presentations and workshops in her areas of specialization, including: childhood apraxia of speech; phonological disorders; children who are non-verbal/lack imitative skills; and treatment of R, interdental & lateral lisps. She has a private practice in Columbia, Illinois providing treatment for children and adolescents. She recently has completed numerous teletherapy sessions with children via Zoom. Julie has a passion for helping children find their voices!

Abstract

There are certain articulation errors that persist in error even with intense speech therapy. Typically, these include sound errors for R (especially vocalic R) and sound errors related to frontal and lateral lisps. These sounds are sometimes very difficult to treat even for the seasoned SLP! Specific oral-motor and speech production issues associated with R and lisps will be fully explained as related to R and strident sound productions. The benefits of teaching your client tongue-jaw differentiation and jaw stability will help these errors decrease. Learn a plethora of beneficial therapy techniques to finally remediate the persistent R error and frontal, lateral or mixed lisp errors to help your clients improve their articulation skills.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Identify tongue and jaw problems and issues related to errored productions of R and lisps.
      • Explain numerous facilitation methods for improving R in all positions of words, especially vocalic R.
      • Explain numerous facilitation methods for decreasing frontal/lateral lisps by improving strident sounds “s, z, sh, ch, j”.

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 30 Minutes – Overview of main tongue and jaw issues related to R and lisp errors
      • 45 Minutes – R facilitation methods/treatment
      • 45 Minutes – Frontal/Lateral lisp facilitation methods/treatment

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional area).

Telepractice Track

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano, MA, CCC-SLP

Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano received her masters degree in speech pathology from the University of Buffalo where she worked at the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology Transfer focusing on AAC systems. She began her career working in a private school for students with complex communication needs. Jennifer then went to work with the Technology for Life and Learning Center ATEAM performing ATevaluations throughout the state of New Jersey. Jennifer started a private consulting business, Technology for Education and Communication Consulting, Inc., specializing in speech, AAC and AT in 2004. In 2018 Jennifer expanded her practice to include a pediatric and adult Speech therapy clinic in Williamstown, NJ, called the South Jersey Speech Center. She has experience with students birth to 21 and specializes in integrating technology solutions into their educational plan. Jennifer has extensive experience working with students with complex communication needs including cerebral palsy, downs syndrome and autism. She has provided numerous trainings across the country on assistive technology, augmentative communication and technology in the field of speech pathology. Jennifer is an adjunct faculty member at Stockton University in the Health Sciences department where she has worked as a professor and clinical supervisor. Jennifer also collaborated with Stockton University to create an AAC program providing advanced training in the field for practicing SLPs.

Abstract

Many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) were thrown into the foray of telespeech therapy services as a result of pandemic closures. Therapists were required to change their service delivery model to adapt to new technology and tools to provide services to their varying populations and caseloads. During this time we have learned a lot about the basics of telespeech, but as social distancing measures stay in place longer than anticipated and fear of a second wave approaches many SLPs are looking to continue to advance their knowledge in telespeech to provide evidence based practice and improved functional outcomes for their caseload. This presentation will address what we learned from the mistakes made during the initial transition to telespeech therapy, how to take our therapy to the next level with more advanced technology integration and the use of telespeech for assessment and evaluation.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Contrast positive and negative attributes of telespeech services using clinical knowledge and evidence based practice measures.
      • Apply newly acquired knowledge in advanced telespeech technology software and hardware to increase active participation for clients across the lifespan.
      • List various clinical assessment tools for evaluation of speech and language disorders.

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 60 Minutes – Review of current state of practice of telespeech platforms and low tech and high tech tools including features and functions that improve functional outcomes for individuals with communication disorders
      • 60 Minutes – Advanced hardware and software that supports synchronous and asynchronous speech therapy sessions

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional area).

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano, MA, CCC-SLP

Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano received her masters degree in speech pathology from the University of Buffalo where she worked at the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology Transfer focusing on AAC systems. She began her career working in a private school for students with complex communication needs. Jennifer then went to work with the Technology for Life and Learning Center ATEAM performing ATevaluations throughout the state of New Jersey. Jennifer started a private consulting business, Technology for Education and Communication Consulting, Inc., specializing in speech, AAC and AT in 2004. In 2018 Jennifer expanded her practice to include a pediatric and adult Speech therapy clinic in Williamstown, NJ, called the South Jersey Speech Center. She has experience with students birth to 21 and specializes in integrating technology solutions into their educational plan. Jennifer has extensive experience working with students with complex communication needs including cerebral palsy, downs syndrome and autism. She has provided numerous trainings across the country on assistive technology, augmentative communication and technology in the field of speech pathology. Jennifer is an adjunct faculty member at Stockton University in the Health Sciences department where she has worked as a professor and clinical supervisor. Jennifer also collaborated with Stockton University to create an AAC program providing advanced training in the field for practicing SLPs.

Abstract

Many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) were thrown into the foray of telespeech therapy services as a result of pandemic closures. Therapists were required to change their service delivery model to adapt to new technology and tools to provide services to their varying populations and caseloads. During this time we have learned a lot about the basics of telespeech, but as social distancing measures stay in place longer than anticipated and fear of a second wave approaches many SLPs are looking to continue to advance their knowledge in telespeech to provide evidence based practice and improved functional outcomes for their caseload. This presentation will address what we learned from the mistakes made during the initial transition to telespeech therapy, how to take our therapy to the next level with more advanced technology integration and the use of telespeech for assessment and evaluation.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Contrast positive and negative attributes of telespeech services using clinical knowledge and evidence based practice measures.
      • Apply newly acquired knowledge in advanced telespeech technology software and hardware to increase active participation for clients across the lifespan.
      • List various clinical assessment tools for evaluation of speech and language disorders.

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 60 Minutes – Informal and non standardized tools for assessment in speech and language disorders. How to create digital assessment protocols and improve data collection during treatment and evaluation sessions
      • 60 Minutes – Standardized testing in the digital age. Review of tools that are currently available and the pros and cons of usage via a digital platform. How to identify appropriate candidates for online testing. What additional software or hardware is needed to correctly implement testing. Legal ramifications of testing and the new research in standardization on digital platforms

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional area).

2-Hour Recorded Presentation
Presented by Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano, MA, CCC-SLP

Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano received her masters degree in speech pathology from the University of Buffalo where she worked at the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology Transfer focusing on AAC systems. She began her career working in a private school for students with complex communication needs. Jennifer then went to work with the Technology for Life and Learning Center ATEAM performing ATevaluations throughout the state of New Jersey. Jennifer started a private consulting business, Technology for Education and Communication Consulting, Inc., specializing in speech, AAC and AT in 2004. In 2018 Jennifer expanded her practice to include a pediatric and adult Speech therapy clinic in Williamstown, NJ, called the South Jersey Speech Center. She has experience with students birth to 21 and specializes in integrating technology solutions into their educational plan. Jennifer has extensive experience working with students with complex communication needs including cerebral palsy, downs syndrome and autism. She has provided numerous trainings across the country on assistive technology, augmentative communication and technology in the field of speech pathology. Jennifer is an adjunct faculty member at Stockton University in the Health Sciences department where she has worked as a professor and clinical supervisor. Jennifer also collaborated with Stockton University to create an AAC program providing advanced training in the field for practicing SLPs.

Abstract

The provision of AAC services most common in our field is the use of hands on methodologies as the primary model of service delivery. For many individuals with complex communication needs both their caregivers and therapists were left to reinvent the wheel to support devices in the home without the ability to provide face to face support. This presentation will address current research in the field of TeleAAC as well as different models of service delivery that are essential for positive outcomes. Participants will learn how to use various technology software and hardware to increase opportunities for instruction, modeling and training of caregivers. This presentation will present programs and resources for the implementation of robust TeleAAC services. The need for TeleAAC past this pandemic will be addressed as well as the future of AAC services and supports in the digital age.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

      • Summarize tools needed for successful implementation of TeleAAC intervention.
      • Connect software and hardware solutions to their current caseload to support AAC implementation, modeling and training.
      • Identify clinical skills needed to support TeleAAC services for individuals with complex communication needs.

 

Time-Ordered Agenda
      • 60 Minutes – TeleAAC research will be presented in detail regarding best practice in the field. In addition, technology software and hardware will be reviewed that increase successful implementation of AAC systems in digital therapy environments.
      • 60 Minutes – TeleAAC training for caregivers and support staff will be discussed as a critical component of successful implementation. In addition, the continued use of TeleAAC post pandemic for medically fragile and rural populations will addressed as we transition to future therapy models that support TeleAAC intervention. Clinical competencies in TeleAAC will be discussed for this mode of service delivery.

This program is offered for 0.2 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional area).

Continuing Education


This program is offered for up to 1.8 ASHA CEUs (various levels, professional area)

Financial Disclosure: José Centeno is receiving an honorarium from NJSHA for his presentation. He will also be referencing his place of work, Rutgers University.
Non-financial Disclosure: José Centeno has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.

Financial Disclosure: Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano is receiving an honorarium from NJSHA for her presentation. She will also be referencing case studies from her place of employment, Technology for Education and Communication Consulting, South Jersey Speech Center and Richard Stockton University.
Non-financial Disclosure: Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.

Financial Disclosure: Julie Hoffmann is receiving an honorarium from NJSHA for her presentation.
Non-financial Disclosure: Julie Hoffmann has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.

Financial Disclosure: Valerie Johnson is receiving an honorarium from NJSHA for her presentation. She will also be referencing her place of work, Rutgers University.
Non-financial Disclosure: Valerie Johnson has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose.