NJSHA Webinars

Upcoming Live Webinars

Date: Wednesday, October 23, 2019
Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm ET

Registration

NJSHA Members: $30
NJSHA Student Members: $5
Non-Members: $50
Student Non-Members: $30

NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.

Additional information and login procedures will be provided to participants after registration.

Presented by Diane J. German, PhD

Diane J. German, PhD a Professor Emeritus at National Louis University, Chicago, Illinois, is an ASHA fellow and a fellow of the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities. She has published many articles and conducted numerous seminars in Word Finding. She is the author of the Test of Word Finding – Third Edition (TWF-3), the Test of Adolescent/Adult Word Finding, Second Edition (TAWF-2), and the Test of Word Finding in Discourse. Most recently, she has authored the new Word Finding Intervention Program, Third Edition (WFIP-3).

Abstract

This webinar will present a comprehensive model for word finding (WF) intervention drawn from the new Word Finding Intervention Program, Third Edition (WFIP-3). Part 1, Characteristics, will focus on semantic and form based WF error patterns in single word and discourse contexts. Part 2, Retrieval Strategies, will match specific retrieval strategies to learners’ WF error patterns. Part 3, WF Based Differentiated Instruction, will match curriculum accommodations to learners WF error patterns for assessment and instruction. Part 4, Self-Advocacy instruction, will demonstrate self-advocacy activities to help learners develop an awareness of their WF difficulties. Part 5, Progress Monitoring, will present two approaches to measuring learners WF intervention success. Please visit www.wordfinding.com to review introductory material.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the characteristics of semantic and form based WF error patterns in single word and discourse contexts.
  • Explain the retrieval strategies appropriate for learners based on their WF error
    patterns.
  • Describe WF Based Differentiated assessment and Instruction of classroom discourse and vocabulary and reading activities for learners with Word Finding difficulties.
  • Explain self-advocacy instruction for learners with WF difficulties.
  • Describe WF based progress monitoring.

Continuing Education


This program is offered for 0.20 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level, professional area)

Presenter Disclosure
Financial Disclosure: Diane German is receiving an honorarium from NJSHA for this presentation. She will also be discussing the book Word Finding Intervention Program, Third Edition (WFIP-3), in which she received royalties from PRO-ED Inc.

Non-financial Disclosure: Diane German does not have any non-financial relationships to disclose.

Date: Monday, November 11, 2019
Time: 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm ET

Registration

NJSHA Members: $25
NJSHA Student Members: $5
Non-Members: $40
Student Non-Members: $25

NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.

Additional information and login procedures will be provided to participants after registration.

Presented by Alyssa Molfese, MM, MA, CCC-SLP

Alyssa Molfese holds a bachelor of music education degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, a master of music education degree from Rutgers University and a master of speech-language pathology degree from Kean University.

As a speech-language pathologist, Alyssa serves a wide population of clients in the public school. In addition, she is the owner of Saunders Music Studio, LLC in Hightstown, New Jersey, works for Speech and Hearing Associates in Metuchen, New Jersey, and Becker ENT in Robbinsville and Princeton, New Jersey. Alyssa is a speaking and singing voice specialist who rehabilitates children, teachers, singers and other professional voice users with vocal fold injuries, or those seeking corrective vocal technique. She also provides gender spectrum voice and communication training. Furthermore, she teaches all genres of signing and many of her students have become professional singers and music teachers.

Alyssa lives in Hightstown, New Jersey with her husband and twin girls. She is also an AFAA certified personal trainer and Certified Precision Nutrition coach who specializes in fitness for busy moms.

Abstract

This webinar will focus on comparing voice therapy to physical therapy or personal training. The subsystems of the voice will be reviewed in a practical way, and exercises explained in a physiological manner, as they would be in physical therapy. Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) will increase their understanding and use of practical exercises resulting in optimal therapeutic outcomes, as well as develop an understanding of the “why” behind vocal hygiene and exercises. After completing this webinar, participants will have a better understanding of voice therapy methodology, and be more equipped to explain therapy to patients/clients. Lastly, for the pediatric population, these exercises will be transcribed into fun games for kids.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss similarities/differences between voice therapy and physical therapy
  • List the three subsystems of vocal production
  • Identify exercises to target coordination of the subsystems, muscle lengthening, contraction, and strengthening
  • Demonstrate how to make exercises into games for kids so that they become fun

Continuing Education


This program is offered for 0.15 ASHA CEUs (introductory level, professional area)

Presenter Disclosure
Financial Disclosure: Alyssa Molfese is receiving an honorarium from NJSHA for this presentation. She will also be referencing case studies from her place of employment, Speech and Hearing Associates and Becker ENT.

Non-financial Disclosure: Alyssa Molfese will be referencing exercise activities in which she is a certified personal trainer through the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America.

Date: Tuesday, December 10, 2019
Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm ET

Registration

NJSHA Members: $30
NJSHA Student Members: $5
Non-Members: $50
Student Non-Members: $30

NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.

Additional information and login procedures will be provided to participants after registration.

Presented by Mary M. McArdle, MA, CCC-SLP

Mary McArdle is currently the early intervention manager for Children’s Specialized Hospital, the nation’s leading provider of inpatient and outpatient care for children from birth to 21 facing special health challenges. Before becoming the manager 15 years ago, she was a staff member providing early intervention services. Prior to working at Children’s Specialized Hospital, she worked for RWJ/Laurie Institute and JFK Johnson Pediatric Rehab providing speech-language, EIP and feeding interventions to children and families. Mary began her career as a speech-language pathologists working for DHS/DDD-MR for 10 years at NJDC in Totowa.

Abstract

Early intervention (EI) is a state and federally funded program that provides supports and services to families of children under the age of three. It is home and community based supports that are intended to enhance the capacity of the family to meet the developmental needs of their children. Due to the nature of service provision-practitioners often find themselves on their own when it comes to understanding the model, when forms are due and how to help parents advocate for their children. This webinar will review policies, procedures and best practices to ensure those providing EI services have the supports they need to provide quality supports to families.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss NJEIS policies and procedures that govern the provision of Early Intervention services in New Jersey
  • Identify resources for families outside of NJEIS for supports, services and understand the transition to preschool process
  • Identify the recourses available to families when they feel their child’s plan is not effective-and how as the family’s practitioner you can support them

Continuing Education


This program is offered for 0.20 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level, professional area)

Presenter Disclosure
Financial Disclosure: Mary McArdle is receiving an honorarium from NJSHA for this presentation.

Non-financial Disclosure: Diane German does not have any non-financial relationships to disclose.

Recorded Webinars

2-Hour Recorded Webinar
Originally presented at 2019 NJSHA Convention

Registration

Available until May 1, 2020
NJSHA Members: $30
NJSHA Student Members: $5
Non-Members: $50
Student Non-Members: $30

NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.

Additional information and login procedures will be provided to participants after registration.

Presented by Katherine Lamb, PhD, CCC-SLP

Katherine Lamb, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Valdosta State University (VSU) in Valdosta, Georgia. Prior to her position at VSU, she was a speech-language pathologist in an acute care hospital setting and graduate clinical supervisor. Dr. Lamb is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Florida Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists, Georgia Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Academy of Neurological Communication Disorders and Sciences. She received her master’s degree in communication sciences and disorders from Governors State University and her doctorate from the University of South Florida. Her research interests include lexical access, semantic relationships and the clinical impact of neurogenic disorders on lexical access. Dr. Lamb’s teaching focus at VSU includes undergraduate and graduate courses in traumatic brain injury, aphasia, dysphagia, neuromotor communication disorders, clinical processes, adult communication disorders, clinical methods, neuroanatomy, organic communication disorders, diagnostics and practicum in voice, fluency and neurogenics.

Abstract

AAC Message Management is the process of choosing content for your client’s device. These steps involve the formulation of the appropriate and functional section of vocabulary and transparent symbols. But, why is this such a difficult endeavor? The pursuit of the optimal vocabulary must consider several aspects to the message. For this session, we will review the purpose for an AAC device, the variation in message management choices that are available and the types of messages on AAC systems. We will also cover the vocabulary needs for different capabilities, the vocabulary needs for different contexts, the vocabulary needs for vocabulary resources and vocabulary needs for supporting conversation. We will also examine several other aspects to the management of messages in an AAC device or system. For example, we will focus on the individual’s specific capabilities, their preferences skill level, their interests, common environments that the user of the AAC will interact, their communicative purpose and accessibility. Incorporating these elements in AAC message management will produce the most advantageous communication options and skills for the individual utilizing an AAC system.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the procedures and processes by which an individual’s communication skills can be maximized for functional and effective communication
  • Identify the types of messages available on AAC systems
  • Differentiate the vocabulary needs in different contexts, capabilities and resources
  • Explain the process for choosing content in the formulating, storing and retrieving messages

Continuing Education


This program is offered for 0.20 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level, professional area)

Presenter Disclosure
Financial Disclosure: Katherine Lamb received an honorarium and travel support from NJSHA for this presentation.

Non-financial Disclosure: Katherine Lamb does not have any non-financial relationships to disclose.

2-Hour Recorded Webinar
Originally presented at 2019 NJSHA Convention

Registration

Available until May 1, 2020
NJSHA Members: $30
NJSHA Student Members: $5
Non-Members: $50
Student Non-Members: $30

NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.

Additional information and login procedures will be provided to participants after registration.

Presented by Panayiota Senekki-Florent, PhD, CCC-SLP

Panayiota Senekki-Florent, PhD, CCC-SLP, has been working as a pediatric speech-language pathologist for the past 21 years and has had the privilege of working exclusively in the area of pediatric dysphagia for 15 years. She founded the first dysphagia clinic in Cyprus in 2006, offering VFSS and FEES and following an 11-year battle with the Ministry of Health and Education was able to establish services for pediatric patients with dysphagia throughout the public and private hospitals and in the public school system. Dr. Senekki-Florent’s passion for serving pediatric patients with dysphagia and in particular, preterm infants, propelled her to pursue a PhD obtained in 2016 from Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. Her research focused on the epidemiology
of feeding and swallowing difficulties in preterm infants.

Abstract

Feeding and swallowing disorders are often associated with genetic syndromes in infants and children. Early identification of infants and children that are at high risk for developing feeding and swallowing difficulties is the primary role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) working with this population, in addition to developing and practicing evidence based interventions that ensure safe and efficient oral feeding.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify universally accepted definitions of pediatric dysphagia
  • Summarize common genetic syndromes associated with dysphagia
  • Identify the role of the SLP as an integral member of the interdisciplinary team
  • Classify current evidence based practice in pediatric dysphagia

Continuing Education


This program is offered for 0.20 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level, professional area)

Presenter Disclosure
Financial Disclosure: Panayiota Senekki-Florent received an honorarium and travel support from NJSHA for her presentation. She is a salaried employee of Johns Hopkins.

Non-financial Disclosure: Panayiota Senekki-Florent does not have any non-financial relationships to disclose.

2-Hour Recorded Webinar
Originally presented at 2019 NJSHA Convention

Registration

NJSHA Members: $30
NJSHA Student Members: $5
Non-Members: $50
Student Non-Members: $30

NJSHA Members, click here to register.
Non-Members, click here to register.

Additional information and login procedures will be provided to participants after registration.

Presented by Katherine Lamb, PhD, CCC-SLP

Katherine Lamb, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Valdosta State University (VSU) in Valdosta, Georgia. Prior to her position at VSU, she was a speech-language pathologist in an acute care hospital setting and graduate clinical supervisor. Dr. Lamb is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Florida Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists, Georgia Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Academy of Neurological Communication Disorders and Sciences. She received her master’s degree in communication sciences and disorders from Governors State University and her doctorate from the University of South Florida. Her research interests include lexical access, semantic relationships and the clinical impact of neurogenic disorders on lexical access. Dr. Lamb’s teaching focus at VSU includes undergraduate and graduate courses in traumatic brain injury, aphasia, dysphagia, neuromotor communication disorders, clinical processes, adult communication disorders, clinical methods, neuroanatomy, organic communication disorders, diagnostics and practicum in voice, fluency and neurogenics.

Abstract

Word retrieval difficulty or failure is a frustrating event. Often, we have clients, children and adults that experience difficulty in retrieving or recalling a word, or are challenged in attempting to name an object or name a pictured item. Our clients will report the sense that it is right on the tip of their tongue, can see the word, know the word and cannot remember or it seems that their mind just goes blank! How many times have you experienced the challenge of not recalling a word or the ability to name? Frustrating. Word recall retrieval or naming may be an issue with lexical access. Lexical access is the process in which lexical entries (words) are activated. This activation has a base in the organization and the representational structure of the lexical entries. Semantic features of words are the prominent semantic characteristics of a word concept. Accessing the semantic features of words can significantly provide an advantage to recall and retrieval of a word concept. In this session, we will address the importance of semantic features, such as the typical and atypical features within a lexical category and semantic representations. Finally, we will utilize these feature representations of word to enhance and improve word retrieval and recall and naming skills for our clients.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define word retrieval and naming difficulty
  • Identify factors that impact the process of word retrieval and naming
  • Describe typical and atypical semantic features
  • Compare and contrast semantic features for intervention

Continuing Education


This program is offered for 0.20 ASHA CEUs (intermediate level, professional area)

Presenter Disclosure
Financial Disclosure: Katherine Lamb received an honorarium and travel support from NJSHA for this presentation.

Non-financial Disclosure: Katherine Lamb does not have any non-financial relationships to disclose.

Registration

This webinar is FREE to NJSHA members. Registration is required.

Register

 

Presented by Lynn Nowak

Lynn Nowak is an experienced lobbyist representing the interests of a wide variety of clients before the legislature and executive branch. She targets client needs, analyzes political trends and then devises and executes a legislative strategy that gets the job done. Ms. Nowak served as president of the lobbying firm of Nancy H. Becker Associates (NBA) for several years before she merged that practice into Porzio Governmental Affairs, LLC (PGA). Prior to becoming the president of NBA, she served as the firm’s executive vice president and vice president of public relations. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the State University of New York at Oswego and has done graduate work in Urban Planning at Rutgers University.

Abstract

This webinar will give participants an overview of the structure of government in Trenton and the elements that go into the creation and passage of legislation.

Learner Outcomes

After completing this course, participants will be able to understand the basic structure of state government in New Jersey, describe how a bill moves through the legislative process and understand how to impact the process.

Additional information and login procedures will be provided to participants after registration.

No ASHA Continuing Education credits are available for this webinar. These may be used as professional hours.

Save the Date: Upcoming Live Webinars – Details Coming Soon

  • Taking the Leap Into Private Practice: Where to Start! January 14, 2020
  • Is it Ethical Dilemmas or the Dilemma of Ethics? March 19, 2020