State School & University Programs

Kean University

Address; 1000 Morris Ave, Union, NJ, 07083
Department Chair: Dr. Martin Shulman (Until June 30, 2019)
NJSHA Contact person: Dr. Mahchid Namazi
NSSLHA Advisor: Dr. Alan Gertner

Monmouth University

Address; 400 Cedar Avenue, West Long Branch, NJ 07764
Department Chair: Patricia Remshifski
NJSHA Contact person: Patricia Remshifski
NSSLHA Advisor: Elisabeth Mlawski

Montclair State University

Address: Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
1515 Broad St. Bloomfield, NJ 07003
Department Chair: Janet Koehnke, PhD CCC-A
NJSHA Contact person: Kathleen Palatucci
NSSLHA Advisor: Rosemary DeStephan

Stockton University

Address: School of Health Sciences, 101 Vera King Farris Drive, Galloway, NJ 08205
Department Chair: Amy J. Hadley, EdD, CCC-SLP
NJSHA Contact person: Amy Hadley or MaryAnn Schiattarella, Academic Fieldwork coordinator
NSSLHA Advisor: Dr. Irene Sanders
Contact Speech And Hearing Club president, Emily Myers

Seton Hall University

Address: 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110
Department Chair: Vikram Dayalu, PhD
NJSHA Contact person: Natalie Neubauer
NSSLHA Advisor: Anthony Koutsoftas

William Paterson University of New Jersey

Address; 300 Pompton Road, Wayne, NJ 07470
Department Chair:  Carole Gelfer
NJSHA Contact person: Kristen Victorino
NSSLHA Advisor: Nicole Magaldi

Spotlight on Higher Education Research at Seton Hall University

By Natalie Neubauer, MS, CCC-SLP

Seton Hall University’s masters’ program in speech-language pathology offers a wide range of faculty-led scholarly research opportunities for students across professional practice areas. The robust research projects that graduate students participate in, provide them with the opportunity to cultivate their knowledge and skills in how to design and conduct an evidence-based study, analyze data and perform a literature review and critique. It is a faculty mentorship model allowing students the chance to collect and present data at professional conferences. Students and faculty have presented at the New Jersey Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s (NJSHA) Annual Convention, at the American Speech-Language-Hearing (ASHA) Convention and students have coauthored peer-reviewed publications.

The research labs within the department at Seton Hall University include the following: Audiology Laboratory, Communication Neuroscience and Aphasia Laboratory, Fluent and Dysfluent Speech Laboratory, The Developmental Language and Cognition Laboratory, The Reading, Oral Language and Writing Laboratory (ROW- Lab), Voice Analytics and Neuropsychology Lab (VAN Lab) and the Speech and Voice Outcomes Laboratory (SVOLab). Below are some examples of faculty-student research that is being conducted.

Through the Reading, Oral Language and Writing Lab (ROW-Lab) directed by Dr. Anthony Koutsoftas, multiple long-term research projects were presented at the 2019 NJSHA Convention. One of the studies focused on Collaborative Classroom- Based Intervention (CCBI) for school-based SLPs. CCBI is when the SLP collaborates with other educators to support speech and language goals within the classroom setting. Ritu Walia, a master’s SLP student presented a practice document that outlines the importance of collaboration when providing classroom-based services and seven best practices for supporting CCBI in school settings. Two other SLP graduate students, Johanna Islinger and Ciera Iandiorio conducted a case study on providing classroom-based language supports to preschool children in their classroom settings. One student focused on language facilitation strategies for a non-verbal preschooler, while the other targeted social pragmatic language for preschool children with autism spectrum disorder. Another case study was done by Kristen Olivieri, an SLP masters’ student, on supporting language comprehension for a fourth-grade student with developmental language disorder in a general education setting and the use of comprehension strategies to support classroom success.

A second study called Project Write to Learn, was presented at NJSHA and ASHA. This has been supported by five year Office of Special Education Programs training grant awarded to Seton Hall University for SLP and occupational therapy (OT) students. As part of this program SLP and OT graduate students learn how to treat writing deficits in school-age children with specific learning disabilities. The third study from which student research has been presented at NJSHA is a collaboration between the ROWLab and Summit Speech School on how to develop and support emergent language and literacy skills in preschool children with hearing impairments. Graduate students, Erin Hanlon and Rachel Gambacorta conducted a single-case multiple baseline study of an intervention to teach Beginning Sound Awareness skills to preschool children with hearing impairments who use hearing assistive technology. Findings from this study demonstrated the feasibility of teaching this skill using a six-week direct instruction intervention validated in prior research. In the Developmental Language and Cognition lab, Dr. Nina Capone Singleton and her MS research students study how multi-modal cues affect word learning. She examines how gestures help toddlers with late language emergence (LLE – or late talkers) learn words. Dr. Capone Singleton uses gestures to make inferences explicit in the word learning process. Dr. Monique Kaye successfully defended her dissertation in Dr. Capone Singleton’s lab examining visual versus verbal cues to idiom meanings.

Currently, Dr. Capone Singleton and her students are examining the effects of multimodal cues on word retrieval in children with and without acquired cognitive disorder (or traumatic brain injury) as well as children with attention deficit disorder.

Dr. Capone Singleton is also the director of The Feeding Project. The Feeding Project examines the typical process of advancing textures in children starting at six months of age. The main aim is to collect data that are meaningful to clinicians to tap for assessment and goal setting. She and her graduate research students are collecting data from a typical meal in the home environment. They are gearing up to collect the same data from children who have oral dysphagia.

Under the mentorship of Drs. Vikram Dayalu and Sona Patel, Alexa Chirichella and Erin Alvino conducted studies that examine individual differences in responses to altered auditory feedback, a technique used clinically to address speech problems in individuals who stutter and with Parkinson’s disease. They used eye tracking as a method of showing that people differ in the amount of cognitive effort required to speak under altered auditory feedback, which may explain why such techniques work for some individuals and not others.

Hunter Fecskovics and Janina Alzate, students under the mentorship of Dr. Sona Patel, conducted interprofessional research with the Athletics Training team at Seton Hall Sports Medicine, led by Anthony J. Testa. In their research, they evaluated speech and language changes in student athletes who sustained a concussion, specifically examining changes during the recovery process. Their results show that these speech changes are indicative of cognitive changes. Their results have been used in a grant application to the New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research.

In the SVO Lab, under the direction of Dr. Kathy Nagle, masters SLP students Anne Bucca and Christian Krommenhoek focused on measuring perceived listening effort (PLE). Using samples of speech produced by individuals with Parkinson disease (PD), the study compared mean ratings of workload, with specific interest in listener reliability. PLE is frequently measured when measures of speech intelligibility are believed to describe only part of the experience of listening in adverse conditions.

Currently, Dr. Nagle and master’s SLP student, Joseph McManaman, are investigating the linguistic complexity of sentences from the Sentence Intelligibility Test (SIT). Using criteria published in the literature on written language complexity, they are analyzing the SIT sentences to obtain a “complexity index”. The goal of this research is to provide a basis for factoring linguistic complexity into research using these stimuli.

Lastly, Dr. Nagle is working with master’s SLP students Elizabeth Kling, Haley Kypers and Natalie Miller on a study of the characteristics of electrolaryngeal speech produced using submental surface EMG- (sEMG) versus thumb button-activated (TB) f0-modulation.This study compares spontaneous speech produced with sEMGcontrolled f0 modulation to TB speech produced by the same laryngectomized speakers. This project is a collaboration with the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation and Griffin Laboratories.

 NJSHA Convention Student Call for Posters

NJSHA invites university students to present research at the Annual Convention.

Requests for Participation in Student Research Projects

The New Jersey Speech-Language-Hearing Association is committed to supporting the education and training of graduate students in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology in the State of New Jersey. The Board of Directors has determined that, upon request, NJSHA will forward requests to participate in research projects conducted by students to the membership through email if the following conditions are satisfied:

  • The request to distribute the solicitation for participants in research must be sent to the President of NJSHA by the Program Director/Department Chair of the program in which the student is enrolled. The student must be enrolled in a program in Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology, or Communication Sciences and Disorders in an institution of higher education located within the State of New Jersey and be a current member of the Association.
  • The request must be accompanied by a statement that says that the research and all related documents have been approved by the Institutional Review Board of the institution.

The email that will be sent to NJSHA members will contain a statement that says that this research has been approved by the IRB of XXX University and that NJSHA does not bear any responsibility for the content and nature of the research.

Requests for Participation in Member Research Projects

The New Jersey Speech-Language-Hearing Association is committed to supporting research in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology in the State of New Jersey. The Board of Directors has determined that, upon request, NJSHA will forward requests to participate in research projects conducted by members to the membership through email if the following conditions are satisfied:

  • The request to distribute the solicitation for participants in research must be sent to the President of NJSHA. The person submitting the request must be a member of NJSHA in good standing and must be either a primary investigator or co-investigator on the project.
  • The request must be accompanied by a statement that says that the research and all related documents have been approved by the Institutional Review Board of the institution.

The email that will be sent to NJSHA members will contain a statement that says that this research has been approved by the IRB of XXX University or Healthcare Institution and that NJSHA does not bear any responsibility for the content and nature of the research.