Friday, April 30

Convention Information | Wednesday Sessions | Thursday Sessions | Saturday Sessions | Posters | Convention Schedule At-A-Glance

SESSION KEY:

All sessions will be available LIVE on the date and time noted.
Indicated sessions will also be recorded and available on-demand May 3-17, 2021.

All sessions are noted in eastern time zone

Amy Cooper, CCC-SLP, The Jersey Speech Lab

This session will cover diagnosis and behavioral treatment of voice disorders in professional voice users, including teachers, broadcasters, actors and singers, as well as patients with upper airway complaints such as vocal cord dysfunction. Special consideration will be given to treatment modifications and techniques specific to singers. The presentation will include an introduction to interpretation of videostroboscopy, how videostroboscopic findings guide behavioral management of patient complaints and how the voice pathologist functions as part of a team or as a consultant to a laryngologist. Evaluation and treatment protocols will be addressed, with interactive portion dedicated to clinician practice of commonly employed voice and upper airway rehabilitation exercises.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Identify organic voice disorders, neurologic voice disorders, functional voice disorders and disorders stemming from laryngeal hypersensitivity
  • Conduct an evaluation for voice and upper airway referrals
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of appropriate therapy techniques to address patient complaints

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Adult

Stefanie LaManna, MS, CCC-SLP, Virtua Health; Karli Negrin, CCC-SLP, Nemours Alfred I DuPont Hospital for Children; Ryan Walker, MD, Advanced ENT

Dysphagia in infants is a complex medical condition that is multifactorial and often influenced by neurological, respiratory and aerodigestive comorbidities. Risk factors for dysphagia are numerous and may include prematurity, congenital anomalies, airway abnormalities, cardiopulmonary disease, neurologic insult and chronic tube dependence. The pathophysiology of swallowing impairments are heterogeneous in this population given the context of multiple developing subsystems, especially in the premature infant, rendering clinical symptomatology unreliable during bedside assessment. Instrumental swallowing assessment, utilizing videofluoroscopy (VFSS) or endoscopy (FEES), provides valuable diagnostic information to guide management of dysphagia in the medically fragile infant, namely by identifying physiologic impairments and appropriate interventions to achieve swallowing integrity. Given the multifaceted nature of dysphagia in infants, interdisciplinary collaboration between physicians and speech-language pathologists with ongoing comprehensive assessment is paramount to promoting successful feeding outcomes. This session aims to discuss the diverse clinical symptomatology associated with dysphagic infants through review of case studies and highlight enhanced patient outcomes following an interdisciplinary team approach.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Define structural and physiologic deficits that can cause dysphagia in infants
  • State clinical indications for use of instrumental evaluations to characterize swallowing physiology in infants
  • Identify therapeutic interventions utilized during instrumentation to achieve swallowing integrity

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:45 am–12:15 pm (Session 20)

Stephen Gonzenbach, EdD, CCC-A/SLP, Retired

Relationships in professional practice with vendors and patients as well as business practices may place the audiologist or speech-language pathologist in an ethical conflict or dilemma. The participant in this session will explore the continuum of ethical behaviors from multiple perspectives to improve recognition of potential ethical conflicts. The participant will be provided with principles of the ethics of best practice and strategies to recognize and manage these potential ethical problems. Through case examples and integration with AAA and/or ASHA Codes of Ethics, participants will be expected to take part in discussion of varied ethical issues. Attendees will need to employ critical thinking and synthesis of multiple viewpoints to address ethical conflicts and dilemmas.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Identify at least two methods to assess an ethical dilemma
  • Identify at least three barriers to ethical practice
  • Identify the obvious and subtle influences of gifts, vendor relations and professional relationships as they effect patient care and treatment

Time-Ordered Agenda:

  • 10 minutes – Overview
  • 20 minutes – Are these ethical issues?
  • 15 minutes – Review and Discussion of Professional COE from ASHA, AAA and NJSHA
  • 35 minutes – Review of Actual Ethical Sanctions by ASHA, AAA and NJSHA Licensure Board
  • 10 minutes – Review and Summary of Part I topics, highlighting daily practice issues that may result in ethical concerns

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:45 am–12:15 pm (Session 21)

Anne Michele Puglisi, AuD

Group audiologic rehabilitation (GAR) is an effective, cost efficient way to provide person centered care to our adult patients with hearing loss. In this presentation, we will discuss the evolving definition of audiologic rehabilitation and the hurdles that may have historically prevented us from realizing it fully in our treatment plans. We will review components of adult audiologic rehabilitation, focusing on those that can be addressed in group format. Supporting literature will be discussed. We will map out two paths to include GAR in your practice. In consideration of traditional, in-person meetings, resources will be provided that will assist you in creating a group curriculum to meet your needs. Finally, emerging digital options will be discussed as an alternative to planning and executing GAR yourself. A newly released digital GAR program called Amptify (from the company clEAR, Inc.) will be highlighted and compared to existing programs on the market.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Define audiologic rehabilitation in the context of person centered care
  • List components of audiologic rehabilitation that can be provided in a group format
  • Describe resources to assist in creation of customized group audiologic rehabilitation content
  • Compare digital tools that incorporate components of audiologic rehabilitation

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Audiology

Jennifer Drenchek-Cristiano, MS, CCC-SLP, Technology for Education and Communication Consulting, Inc.; Catherine Fredericks, MA, CCC-SLP, ATP/CAS, Wayne Board of Education; Barbra Seltzer, MS, CCC-SLP, ATP, Access Communication and Therapy; Travis Tallman, MS, CCC-SLP, ATP, New Jersey Institute for Disabilities and Lakeview School

The presence of a Core Vocabulary Board on a playground not only provides for increased communication for all children, but it also increases community exposure to AAC. Given these facts, most would agree that designing and producing Playground Core Boards should be a high priority for communities in their efforts to create accessible and communication friendly playgrounds. Designing and creating customized communication boards however, involves many steps and can be a daunting undertaking without some guidance. A Core Vocabulary Playground Board was recently designed and installed in Wayne Township, New Jersey. It is our goal to demystify the process involved in the creation of a Custom Communication Playground Board. This session will outline the steps and considerations involved from inception to implementation. It is our hope that by presenting a clear “blueprint”, we will simplify the process enough to inspire the creation of Core Playground Boards throughout the state.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • State possible considerations for Playground Core Board locations.
  • State possible permissions required for placement of a Playground Core Board.
  • Identify possible funding sources for creation of a Playground Core Board.
  • Discuss factors to consider in creating a custom Playground Core Board.

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Stefanie LaManna, MS, CCC-SLP, Virtua Health; Karli Negrin, CCC-SLP, Nemours Alfred I DuPont Hospital for Children; Ryan Walker, MD, Advanced ENT

Dysphagia in infants is a complex medical condition that is multifactorial and often influenced by neurological, respiratory and aerodigestive comorbidities. Risk factors for dysphagia are numerous and may include prematurity, congenital anomalies, airway abnormalities, cardiopulmonary disease, neurologic insult and chronic tube dependence. The pathophysiology of swallowing impairments are heterogeneous in this population given the context of multiple developing subsystems, especially in the premature infant, rendering clinical symptomatology unreliable during bedside assessment. Instrumental swallowing assessment, utilizing videofluoroscopy (VFSS) or endoscopy (FEES), provides valuable diagnostic information to guide management of dysphagia in the medically fragile infant, namely by identifying physiologic impairments and appropriate interventions to achieve swallowing integrity. Given the multifaceted nature of dysphagia in infants, interdisciplinary collaboration between physicians and speech-language pathologists with ongoing comprehensive assessment is paramount to promoting successful feeding outcomes. This session aims to discuss the diverse clinical symptomatology associated with dysphagic infants through review of case studies and highlight enhanced patient outcomes following an interdisciplinary team approach.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Define structural and physiologic deficits that can cause dysphagia in infants
  • State clinical indications for use of instrumental evaluations to characterize swallowing physiology in infants
  • Identify therapeutic interventions utilized during instrumentation to achieve swallowing integrity

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Stephen Gonzenbach, EdD, CCC-A/SLP, Retired

Relationships in professional practice with vendors and patients as well as business practices may place the audiologist or speech-language pathologist in an ethical conflict or dilemma. The participant in this session will explore the continuum of ethical behaviors from multiple perspectives to improve recognition of potential ethical conflicts. The participant will be provided with principles of the ethics of best practice and strategies to recognize and manage these potential ethical problems. Through case examples and integration with AAA and/or ASHA Codes of Ethics, participants will be expected to take part in discussion of varied ethical issues. Attendees will need to employ critical thinking and synthesis of multiple viewpoints to address ethical conflicts and dilemmas.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Identify at least two methods to assess an ethical dilemma
  • Identify at least three barriers to ethical practice
  • Identify the obvious and subtle influences of gifts, vendor relations and professional relationships as they effect patient care and treatment

Time-Ordered Agenda:

  • 5 minutes – Review of Presentation Outcomes
  • 10 minutes – Exploring patient abuse adult and child
  • 15 minutes – Effects of Gifts
  • 10 minutes – Examining Barriers to Ethical Practice
  • 15 minutes – Methods to evaluate ethical concerns
  • 25 minutes – Apply strategies to ethical concerns and issues
  • 10 minutes – Questions

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

Karen J. Kushla, ScD, CCC-A, FAAA, Lehman College, CUNY

In New Jersey, approximately 11 percent of adults have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, a chronic health condition that is caused by lack of or insensitivity to insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas. Insulin helps the body use glucose effectively. Of the two types of diabetes, Type 2 (aka adult-onset) is the most common due to increased body weight and lack exercise, whereas Type 1 (aka juvenile) diabetes is less common than Type 2 and requires insulin injections to manage effects of the disease. Both types of diabetes puts an individual at risk for a number of serious complications, namely blindness, cardiovascular disease and renal disease due to peripheral neuropathy. Other sequelae of diabetes may also include disorders of communication and balance control due to secondary factors of this chronic illness. This session will discuss the effect of Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus on communication in affected individuals. Attention will be paid to speech and language deficits along with deficits of hearing and balance.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Differentiate between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Discuss disorders of speech and language due to complications of diabetes mellitus
  • Discuss disorders of hearing and balance due to complications of diabetes mellitus

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

This session welcomes all current and recently graduated students who will be entering the professional arena. A panel of presenters with a wide range of clinical experience will share Information to help prepare attendees for the process of interviewing for placements and CFs. There will be an opportunity to ask questions, interact with the panel and learn more about the professional support and ongoing education NJSHA provides.

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: University Students

Leigh Carrico Mann, MS, CCC-SLP, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

While the SLP’s typical role in end-of-life care is usually related to dysphagia, our communication expertise may be just as important when it comes to patient advocacy. The better we understand what is happening, the better we can use our clinical insight to counsel patients, family and staff throughout the dying process, and to make sure the patient’s voice and wishes are heard. This session will provide specific training about typical processes that occur before a person dies, including physical and emotional changes. We will look at dying in both pediatrics and adults, and explore the options offered by comfort care. We will consider how to approach conversations with staff/families/patients when rehab plans may be unrealistic and look at potential goals of care. Whether we practice in a medical or academic environment, death is the universal experience that will touch us all at some point. It requires both clinical prowess and emotional sensitivity to optimally address a dying person’s needs. We cannot count on the staff around us to direct the goals of care without our input, and we can help keep the patient and family central to ever-changing priorities.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Identify the signs that death may occur within months or weeks
  • Name at least five disciplines that are crucial to supportive care at the end of life
  • Identify at least three strategies to offer staff that support comfort care
  • Expand ability to create palliative communication or swallow therapy goals, when clinically indicated

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Adult

Part 2 of this session will take place 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm (Session 28)

Anita Archer, PhD, Educational Consultant

The quality of written compositions is only as good as the quality of the embedded sentences. Thus, we need to provide powerful instruction on the construction of sentences. In this session, Dr. Archer will introduce a number of strategies for increasing the clarity and sophistication of sentences including use of sentence dictation, sentence patterns, sentence activities, sentence expansion, sentence combining and sentence frames. Improve your students’ writing, one sentence at a time.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Describe activities that can be used to strengthen students’ sentence writing
  • Explain how sentence expansion and sentence combining activities can be implemented
  • Explain the use of sentence and paragraph frames can be used to scaffold writing

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 2 of this session will take place 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm (Session 29)

Barbara Weinstein, PhD, CCC-A, Graduate Center, CUNY

Communication is a cornerstone of quality care in society in general and in health care settings in particular. In fact. effective communication allows individuals to participate more fully in their care. When a patient understands what is being said about his/her care, treatment and services, that patient is more likely to be activated to fulfill critical health care responsibilities. A major obstacle to effective communication in health care settings, age related hearing loss (ARHL) is increasing in prevalence and has been acknowledged to be a major public health problem. First and foremost, untreated hearing loss interferes with shared decision making and patient provider interactions. Further, the impacts range from cognitive and functional declines to diminished psychosocial well-being, activity limitations and social isolation. This session will provide a framework for understanding the downstream consequences of ARHL and a lens for understanding how to best identify persons with ARHL and to manage the negative impacts. The behavioral underpinnings of hearing health care interventions and outcomes will be reviewed. The session will conclude with an overview of the relationship between healthy aging and hearing health.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Discuss the framework for understanding the connection between age related hearing loss, reduced communicative effectiveness and social disengagement
  • Apply behavioral theories to facilitate and optimize self management of challenges posed by age related hearing loss
  • Counsel persons with ARHL regarding the continuum of hearing health care interventions and appropriateness as a function of clinical presentation

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

Part 2 of this session will take place 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm (Session 30)

Susane Dardeir, EdD, CCC-SLP, Elizabeth Public Schools, Kean University

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) highlights the need for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to understand the differentiating characteristics among various dialects. This skill is required to be able to differentiate between a dialectical difference and a speech sound disorder (SSD). Despite this, many children continue to be misdiagnosed as having an SSD when their speech differences are due to second language or regional influence. With the ever increasing number of multilingual children in the schools within the state of New Jersey, this has become a significant area needing greater attention. Formal assessment measures for articulation merely show whether an error is present. It is up to the individual SLP to utilize functional measures to make an accurate judgment. When the SLP has not been trained in functional assessment or has been trained to conduct informal testing procedures but does not know what to do with the results, it can cause great difficulty and incorrect assessment results. This program is aimed at giving SLPs a greater understanding to identify between dialect and SSD, help them to understand the importance of functional assessment measures, and provide them with the tools needed to make appropriate assessment decisions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Summarize the importance of functional measures in assessment with multilingual children
  • Identify personal biases that impact ability to discern between dialectical difference and articulation disorder in multilingual children
  • Discuss cultural and linguistic differences that need to be taken into consideration during assessment

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Leigh Carrico Mann, MS, CCC-SLP, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

While the SLP’s typical role in end-of-life care is usually related to dysphagia, our communication expertise may be just as important when it comes to patient advocacy. The better we understand what is happening, the better we can use our clinical insight to counsel patients, family and staff throughout the dying process, and to make sure the patient’s voice and wishes are heard. This session will provide specific training about typical processes that occur before a person dies, including physical and emotional changes. We will look at dying in both pediatrics and adults, and explore the options offered by comfort care. We will consider how to approach conversations with staff/families/patients when rehab plans may be unrealistic and look at potential goals of care. Whether we practice in a medical or academic environment, death is the universal experience that will touch us all at some point. It requires both clinical prowess and emotional sensitivity to optimally address a dying person’s needs. We cannot count on the staff around us to direct the goals of care without our input, and we can help keep the patient and family central to ever-changing priorities.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Identify the signs that death may occur within months or weeks
  • Name at least five disciplines that are crucial to supportive care at the end of life
  • Identify at least three strategies to offer staff that support comfort care
  • Expand ability to create palliative communication or swallow therapy goals, when clinically indicated

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Adult

Anita Archer, PhD, Educational Consultant

The quality of written compositions is only as good as the quality of the embedded sentences. Thus, we need to provide powerful instruction on the construction of sentences. In this session, Dr. Archer will introduce a number of strategies for increasing the clarity and sophistication of sentences including use of sentence dictation, sentence patterns, sentence activities, sentence expansion, sentence combining and sentence frames. Improve your students’ writing, one sentence at a time.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Describe activities that can be used to strengthen students’ sentence writing
  • Explain how sentence expansion and sentence combining activities can be implemented
  • Explain the use of sentence and paragraph frames can be used to scaffold writing

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Barbara Weinstein, PhD, CCC-A, Graduate Center, CUNY

Communication is a cornerstone of quality care in society in general and in health care settings in particular. In fact. effective communication allows individuals to participate more fully in their care. When a patient understands what is being said about his/her care, treatment and services, that patient is more likely to be activated to fulfill critical health care responsibilities. A major obstacle to effective communication in health care settings, age related hearing loss (ARHL) is increasing in prevalence and has been acknowledged to be a major public health problem. First and foremost, untreated hearing loss interferes with shared decision making and patient provider interactions. Further, the impacts range from cognitive and functional declines to diminished psychosocial well-being, activity limitations and social isolation. This session will provide a framework for understanding the downstream consequences of ARHL and a lens for understanding how to best identify persons with ARHL and to manage the negative impacts. The behavioral underpinnings of hearing health care interventions and outcomes will be reviewed. The session will conclude with an overview of the relationship between healthy aging and hearing health.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Discuss the framework for understanding the connection between age related hearing loss, reduced communicative effectiveness and social disengagement
  • Apply behavioral theories to facilitate and optimize self management of challenges posed by age related hearing loss
  • Counsel persons with ARHL regarding the continuum of hearing health care interventions and appropriateness as a function of clinical presentation

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology