Friday, April 24

Convention Information |Thursday Sessions |

Sharon Moss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BC-NCD, CAE, American Society for Association Executives Foundation

This session will focus on skill development in advocacy, leadership and volunteerism related to the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology. A member of the ASHA Board of Directors will discuss strategies for successful advocacy, opportunities to lead and ways to get involved. Issues described in ASHA’s Public Policy Agenda (PPA) will be highlighted as well as strategies for how speech-language pathologists and audiologists can get involved in advocacy efforts to ensure favorable outcomes for members and consumers in their state related to advocating for maintaining current IDEA funding levels and the use of terminology that is consistent in both IDEA and ESSA/ESEA regulatory language, promoting comprehensive coverage of audiology services and ensuring that private and public insurance includes coverage of habilitation services and increasing recruitment and retention of the full continuum of speech-language pathology and audiology personnel available to meet the needs of individuals with communication disorders.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify current and relevant advocacy issues
• Describe key components of the Public Policy Agenda
• Identify strategies for applying volunteer leadership skills to other settings
• Identify valuable leadership skills

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Amyn Amlani, PhD, Audigy

Hearing healthcare is evolving at a rapid rate. Origins of this evolution stem, in part, from the recent proliferation of disruptive innovations (e.g., OTCs/PSAPs, pharmaceuticals), along with changes in population and economic dynamics. This session provides participants with empirical evidence that highlight the profession’s increased awareness and professional value. Attendees will also be provided with relevant content that allows them to navigate the forthcoming challenges in the new market landscape.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe the limitations of traditional hearing healthcare landscape
• Describe the various events that are the foundation to hearing healthcare reform
• Consider and implement opportunities that afford market and professional growth
• Detail the various innovative disruptions entering the hearing care space

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Audiology

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:30 am–12:00 pm (Session 36)

Improving Written Compositions One Sentence at a Time – Part 1

Anita Archer, PhD, Educational Consultant

The quality of written compositions is only as good as the quality of the embedded sentences. Thus, we need to provide powerful instruction on the construction of sentences. In this session, Dr. Archer will introduce a number of strategies for increasing the clarity and sophistication of sentences including use of sentence dictation, sentence patterns, sentence activities, sentence expansion, sentence combining and sentence frames. Improve your students’ writing, one sentence at a time.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe activities that can be used to strengthen students’ sentence writing
• Explain how sentence expansion and sentence combining activities can be implemented
• Explain the use of sentence and paragraph frames can be used to scaffold writing

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:30 am–12:00 pm (Session 37)

Theresa Harp, MA, CCC-SLP, LSLS CERT. AVT, Sound Speech, LLC

Are you an SLP currently serving a child with hearing loss and wondering if you’re doing everything you should be? Are you struggling to remember how to read an audiogram or–perhaps more importantly–why the audiogram even matters? Maybe you’re not clear on appropriate goals and objectives or how to implement effective, research-based therapy strategies for this unique population. Relatively speaking, hearing loss is a low incidence condition. To further complicate matters, the hearing loss population itself can vary greatly depending upon a number of factors, including type and degree of hearing loss, age at diagnosis, chosen communication modality and hearing technology. Whether you are currently working in early intervention, the school system, or private practice, this session will provide you with a general overview of the basics of pediatric hearing loss. The presenter will review the different types and degrees of hearing loss, communication modalities and hearing technology. A brief overview of auditory milestones and language strategies will be shared, as well as video examples of these strategies being implemented in sessions with children with hearing loss. This session will also provide a brief overview of the ways in which hearing loss can affect other developmental domains, including cognition, social emotional skills and motor skills. Participants will leave the session with information, resources and strategies that can immediately be implemented during sessions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Interpret the audiogram of familiar sounds
• Explain the difference between a conductive hearing loss and a sensorineural hearing loss
• List three therapeutic resources designed specifically for use with children with hearing loss

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Jennifer Moore, EdD CCC-SLP, Talk Moore Speech Services; Lina Slim-Topdjian, PhD, BCBA-D, CCC-SLP, A Step Ahead Program, LLC

Difficulty with verbal communication is one of the most salient and debilitating characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014; & Rogers et al., 2006). Researchers estimate approximately 22 percent of children with autism between the ages of three and four years do not develop the ability to speak beyond a few single words (Paul, Chawarska, Klin, & Volmar, 2007). Several theories postulate that these communication deficits originate from underlying basic motor speech and oral motor dysfunction (Adams, 1998; Belmonte et al., 2013; Gernsbacher et al., 2002; Gernsbacher, Sauer, Geye, Schweigert, & Goldsmith, 2008; Page & Boucher, 1998; Tierney et al., 2015). Motor speech control refers to the coordinated and precise movement of the articulators and speech mechanism (e.g., lips, tongue, jaw, vocal apparatus, diaphragm) to produce a rapid stream of phonemes with sufficient clarity to be understood as natural language (Thelen, 1995). Children who exhibit motor speech dysfunction have difficulty moving their oral musculature to coordinate speech movements to produce sounds and words. There are no speech therapy interventions specifically designed for children with autism and coexisting motor speech dysfunction. Clinicians need to implement strategies from various evidence-based methodologies to create an individualized treatment plan. This session will discuss and demonstrate effective evidence-based strategies and teaching procedures for teaching motor speech skills to children with autism.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• List three effective strategies that capture and increase motivation in children with ASD
• Write three functional and measurable goals for therapy
• List three effective teaching procedures that lead to improved motor speech productions in children with ASD

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Donna Spillman-Kennedy, MS, CCC-SLP, Integrated Speech Pathology, LLC; Sharon Lee Armstrong, PhD, La Salle University; Janice Gordon, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice; Carolyn Gerber Satko, MS, CCC-SLP, The School District of Lancaster; Evelyn Klein, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, La Salle University

In this session, participants will learn about children with selective mutism (SM), some basic rules for successfully interacting with them, and how to use EXPRESS to systematically promote social engagement, communication skills and literacy. speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need effective strategies to serve children with SM, a social communication anxiety disorder characterized by a reluctance to speak. This reluctance is rooted in anxiety but is often accompanied by communication deficits that compound the disorder, including: using sufficient words per sentence; using compound and complex sentences; retelling a story; making up a story about a picture; and using imagination to express thoughts. (Klein, Armstrong & Shipon-Blum, 2013). These communication deficits in SM inspired the development of the EXPRESS (EXPanding Receptive and Expressive Skills Through Stories) Program for children ages 3-11. Each EXPRESS session begins with reading one of 25 popular children’s stories selected on the basis of the child’s age, literacy and lexile levels and communication comfort level (from Shipon-Blum, 2015), which can range from being nonvocal to making phonemic sounds to saying words to producing scripted, and ultimately, spontaneous sentences. Engaging and interactive activities based on the chosen story build vocabulary, phonological awareness and comprehension and production of simple, compound and complex sentences. Subsequently, there are question-answer routines for practicing sentences and modeling the narrative structure of the story. Finally, the SLP and child engage in progressive steps toward story generation accompanied by auditory and visual support using pictures and text. Additionally, EXPRESS incorporates progress monitoring, using charting and working toward motivating rewards.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify three defining characteristics of SM
• List five levels of communication comfort for expanding vocalization and verbalization with children who have SM
• List five strategies to assist in the treatment of communication deficits in SM
• Use the levels of communication comfort and literacy and lexile levels to identify a starting point for building communication skills

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:45 am–12:15 pm (Session 38)

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University

This session will provide an overview of the different types of fluency disorders SLPs may encounter in clients of all ages. Disorders covered will include stuttering, covert stuttering, cluttering and atypical disfluency. Assessment and differential diagnosis will be covered. Myths and pitfalls related to assessment of all disfluencies will be covered. Critically thinking through everyday problems in diagnosis and assessment will be presented, using real cases as examples. This session will serve as a foundation to teen/adult and pediatric disfluency workshops throughout the day.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Define stuttering, cluttering, and atypical disfluency
• Name one strategy for differential diagnosis of cluttering from stuttering and atypical disfluency
• Name one strategy for differential diagnosis of covert stuttering from cluttering

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based/Adult

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:45 am–12:15 pm (Session 39)

Amyn Amlani, PhD, Audigy

Hearing healthcare is evolving at a rapid rate. Origins of this evolution stem, in part, from the recent proliferation of disruptive innovations (e.g., OTCs/PSAPs, pharmaceuticals), along with changes in population and economic dynamics. This session provides participants with empirical evidence that highlight the profession’s increased awareness and professional value. Attendees will also be provided with relevant content that allows them to navigate the forthcoming challenges in the new market landscape.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe the limitations of traditional hearing healthcare landscape
• Describe the various events that are the foundation to hearing healthcare reform
• Consider and implement opportunities that afford market and professional growth
• Detail the various innovative disruptions entering the hearing care space

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Audiology

Anita Archer, PhD, Educational Consultant

The quality of written compositions is only as good as the quality of the embedded sentences. Thus, we need to provide powerful instruction on the construction of sentences. In this session, Dr. Archer will introduce a number of strategies for increasing the clarity and sophistication of sentences including use of sentence dictation, sentence patterns, sentence activities, sentence expansion, sentence combining and sentence frames. Improve your students’ writing, one sentence at a time.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe activities that can be used to strengthen students’ sentence writing
• Explain how sentence expansion and sentence combining activities can be implemented
• Explain the use of sentence and paragraph frames can be used to scaffold writing

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Donna Spillman-Kennedy, MS, CCC-SLP, Integrated Speech Pathology, LLC; Sharon Lee Armstrong, PhD, La Salle University; Janice Gordon, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice; Carolyn Gerber Satko, MS, CCC-SLP, The School District of Lancaster; Evelyn Klein, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, La Salle University

In this session, participants will learn about children with selective mutism (SM), some basic rules for successfully interacting with them, and how to use EXPRESS to systematically promote social engagement, communication skills and literacy. speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need effective strategies to serve children with SM, a social communication anxiety disorder characterized by a reluctance to speak. This reluctance is rooted in anxiety but is often accompanied by communication deficits that compound the disorder, including: using sufficient words per sentence; using compound and complex sentences; retelling a story; making up a story about a picture; and using imagination to express thoughts. (Klein, Armstrong & Shipon-Blum, 2013). These communication deficits in SM inspired the development of the EXPRESS (EXPanding Receptive and Expressive Skills Through Stories) Program for children ages 3-11. Each EXPRESS session begins with reading one of 25 popular children’s stories selected on the basis of the child’s age, literacy and lexile levels and communication comfort level (from Shipon-Blum, 2015), which can range from being nonvocal to making phonemic sounds to saying words to producing scripted, and ultimately, spontaneous sentences. Engaging and interactive activities based on the chosen story build vocabulary, phonological awareness and comprehension and production of simple, compound and complex sentences. Subsequently, there are question-answer routines for practicing sentences and modeling the narrative structure of the story. Finally, the SLP and child engage in progressive steps toward story generation accompanied by auditory and visual support using pictures and text. Additionally, EXPRESS incorporates progress monitoring, using charting and working toward motivating rewards.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify three defining characteristics of SM
• List five levels of communication comfort for expanding vocalization and verbalization with children who have SM
• List five strategies to assist in the treatment of communication deficits in SM
• Use the levels of communication comfort and literacy and lexile levels to identify a starting point for building communication skills

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University

This session will examine the treatment of stuttering, cluttering and atypical disfluencies in teens and adults. Critically thinking through everyday problems in treatment will be presented, using real cases as examples. Emphasis will be upon using the skills and evidence we have, considering all client needs and making logical and practical choices. Myths and pitfalls related to treatment of all disfluencies will be covered. Cases will include multiple fluency diagnoses, acquired vs. developmental stuttering, and fluency diagnoses with concomitant disorders. Treatment strategies will be presented throughout the workshop.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Name one strategy for working with stuttering in teens and adults
• Name one strategy for working with cluttering in teens and adults
• Name one strategy for choosing a practical treatment path when working with teens and adults with disfluency

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based/Adult

Jose Centeno, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rutgers School of Health Professions

The interaction of increasing stroke prevalence due to global population aging with improved stroke survival and steady growth in international migration is estimated to expand multiethnic geriatric populations with chronic post-stroke aphasia worldwide. Regarding the United States, a top host of international migrants, ethnic minorities will approximate 42 percent of the 65-year-and-over population in 2050 (FIFA, 2012). Many of these individuals are bilingual, as suggested by estimates of 78 percent (47 million) minority-language speakers that use English well (US Census Bureau, 2013). With stroke survivors expected to number 3.4 million by 2030 (Obviagele et al., 2013) and individuals with post-stroke aphasia to approximate 100,000 new cases a year in the US (Ellis & Urban, 2016; Norise & Hamilton, 2017), large multiethnic-multilingual aphasia caseloads are projected in US neurorehabilitation programs (Centeno, 2019). Despite the steady growth in multiethnic-multilingual stroke groups in the US, SLPs serving bi/multilingual aphasia persons frequently experience conceptual and clinical challenges due to training and resource limitations (Centeno, 2009; 2015). This session will provide a principled framework to serve bi/multilingual individuals with aphasia. We will start with foundational knowledge that enhances accuracy in the diagnosis between genuine disorders (resulting from the stroke) and experiential behaviors (resulting from life experiences, including bi/multilingual histories) and conclude with the application of these foundational bases to the design of plausible intervention strategies to facilitate linguistic recovery, minimize the extent of the disability, and promote social functioning (Centeno, 2007; Centeno et al., 2017; World Health Organization, 2001).

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Discuss world and local demographic and epidemiological stroke factors pertinent to aphasia management in multiethnic-multilingual adult populations
• Explain the relevance of sociocultural, acquisitional, and neurolinguistic variables in the assessment of bi/multilingual persons with aphasia
• Discuss the crucial variables needed to design ecologically valid, conceptually-grounded personalized intervention strategies for bilingual/multilingual persons with aphasia
• Explain the connection between a bilingual aphasia profile and the client’s sociocultural, acquisitional and neurolinguistic background

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Adult

Karen Kimberlin, SLPD, CCC-SLP

It was previously thought that a student’s language skills were fully developed by late childhood, although those of us who work with students between the ages of 12 and 20 years know better! Research confirms that throughout the adolescent years, the expectations for oral language change significantly and these have a dramatic effect on written language. This session will address some of the most important changes that take place within the five domains of language (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics/discourse), discuss the impact on academics or reading and writing and provide recommendations for intervention.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Cite three benefits to teaching morphological awareness.
• List two important changes that occur in adolescent language at the syntactic level and relate how these may impact written expression
• Describe the conversational or pragmatic changes that occur during adolescence between peers and parents and the topics discussed
• List two new pieces of information learned from presented research
• Describe the difference between concrete and abstract proverbs; provide a rationale for assessment and intervention; and provide three instruction strategies to improve understanding of proverbs

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 2 of this session will take place 1:30 pm–3:00 pm (Session 49)

NJSHA Audiology Committee

This session will provide a review and discussion of current professional and legislative issues in audiology at the state and national level. There will be an opportunity to meet with NJSHA’s legislative agent and the Audiology Committee for questions and answers on audiology issues in New Jersey.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Summarize legislative issues in New Jersey
• Summarize national audiology issues
• Describe trends in professional practice

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Audiology

Allison Frederick, MS, CCC-SLP, CBIST, ARC Seminars, Encompass Health Rehabilitation Hospital of Vineland

This introductory level session will identify the common behavioral disturbances present in adults with acquired brain injury and will summarize strategies to assist with behavior management and planning.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Define the two types of acquired brain injury, and be able to list types of each
• Define and summarize informal and formal assessment tools utilized to identify behaviors in this population
• Discuss the need for behavior planning and management strategies in the clinical setting in order to maximize functional patient outcomes

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Adult

Caitlin Saxtein, MS, CCC-SLP
Caitlin Saxtein, MS, CCC-SLP, Peconic Bay Medical Center

Clinical supervision in speech-language pathology builds opportunities to foster growth in both the supervisor and supervisee. Acquiring competency as a supervisor is essential to direct effective clinical training. Establishing expectations, monitoring and adjusting them as necessary, together, supports clinical reflection and yields opportunity for communication and feedback. Essential elements of successful supervision encompass research, mentoring, communication and analysis. Exemplary supervision will change the lead for the future.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe how critical reflection supports the professional growth of both the supervisee and supervisor
• Identify the role of the speech-language pathologist to integrate critical thinking skills in clinical training
• Discuss essential elements of successful supervision

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

This session qualifies for the ASHA supervision requirement.

Theresa Harp, MA, CCC-SLP, LSLS CERT. AVT, Sound Speech

Are you the owner of a relatively new private practice and looking to grow your business? Are you feeling a little unsure about how to reach your business goals? Whether you are providing private services on the side or this is your full-time job, owning a small business is not for the faint of heart! While it may feel like you are all alone, you’re not! There are many resources that are available to you, including websites, books, podcasts, business coaches and organizations. Better yet, you can access many of these resources for free! This session is designed for those who have already established their business but are feeling lost in terms of resources and support in where to go from here. The speaker will provide an overview of some of the best-kept secrets for building your business so that you can focus on what you do best: providing speech-language and hearing services.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• List three resources to assist them in growing their private practice
• Write at least three SMART goals related to their private practice
• Exchange contact information with at least one other member of the audience to use as a future resource

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest

Part 2 of this session will take place 3:15 pm–4:45 pm (Session 24)

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Misericordia University

This session will provide an overview of the different types of fluency disorders SLPs may encounter in clients of all ages. Disorders covered will include stuttering, covert stuttering, cluttering and atypical disfluency. Assessment and differential diagnosis will be covered. Myths and pitfalls related to assessment of all disfluencies will be covered. Critically thinking through everyday problems in diagnosis and assessment will be presented, using real cases as examples. This session will serve as a foundation to teen/adult and pediatric disfluency workshops throughout the day.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Define stuttering, cluttering and atypical disfluency
• Name one strategy for differential diagnosis of cluttering from stuttering and atypical disfluency
• Name one strategy for differential diagnosis of covert stuttering from cluttering

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based/Adult

Valerie E. Johnson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Over the past 20 years there has been a considerable amount of research published on understanding AAE use in children (Stockman, 2010). This research focused on describing normal language development in AAE-speaking children (e.g., Koonce, 2015; Newkirk, Oetting, & Stockman, 2016); examining biases in norm-referenced assessment tools (e.g., Cole &Taylor, 1990); differentiating dialect from disordered language behaviors (e.g., Seymour, Bland-Stewart, and Green 1998; Washington & Craig, 2000); bi-dialectal proficiency and teaching MAE to AAE speakers (e.g., Edwards & Rosin, 2017); and examination of the possible link between children’s use of AAE and poor literacy outcomes (e.g., Charity and Scarborough, & Griffin, 2004 ). The themes or topics examined in the literature on children’s use of AAE has not really changed much from the 1970s. What has changed, however, seems to be a consistent movement away from more pluralistic models of understanding the relationship between children’s language behaviors and the assessment of their educational outcomes (Smitherman, 1998). This is relevant to SLPs given the historical nature of our field’s practices to readily identify speakers of AAE as having a communication disorder in need of remediation (Van Keulen, Weddington, & DeBose, 1998). Despite a larger literature base on normal language development of AAE speakers and the guidelines from the ASHA position statement (1983) and technical reports (2003) related to dialect use, SLPs continue to struggle with the assessment and treatment in African American children. The use of culturally responsive frameworks to guide research and clinical practice will be discussed.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Discuss the literature describing the normal communication behaviors of children who use AAE and its implications for assessment
• Discuss the importance of considering historical context in the development of the ASHA position statements and technical reports
• Explain how culturally responsive frameworks might help SLPs engage in effective practices during service delivery to children who use AAE

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Karen Kimberlin, SLPD, CCC-SLP

It was previously thought that a student’s language skills were fully developed by late childhood, although those of us who work with students between the ages of 12 and 20 years know better! Research confirms that throughout the adolescent years, the expectations for oral language change significantly and these have a dramatic effect on written language. This session will address some of the most important changes that take place within the five domains of language (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics/discourse), discuss the impact on academics or reading and writing and provide recommendations for intervention.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Cite three benefits to teaching morphological awareness.
• List two important changes that occur in adolescent language at the syntactic level and relate how these may impact written expression
• Describe the conversational or pragmatic changes that occur during adolescence between peers and parents and the topics discussed
• List two new pieces of information learned from presented research
• Describe the difference between concrete and abstract proverbs; provide a rationale for assessment and intervention; and provide three instruction strategies to improve understanding of proverbs

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Amyn Amlani, PhD, Audigy; Brian Taylor, AuD, Signia; Joseph Montano, EdD, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital

This session will provide a panel discussion among industry influencers and experts in audiology. This will be a conversation about what’s new in audiologic service delivery, the hearing care industry and current issues relevant to clinical practice. We will discuss the challenges facing the profession of audiology and how to approach the ever-changing landscape of hearing care service delivery. Topics will include patient-centered care, a service versus product delivery model and the value of audiologist care across the full scope of hearing and balance treatment services. There will be discussion of current hearing aid technology, OTC, professional practices and more, with opportunity to address the panel and ask questions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Summarize patient-centered care approaches for evaluating individuals with hearing loss and fitting amplification.
• Discuss new approaches to face current challenges in amplification technology delivery, including hearing aids and OTCs.
• Identify other professional services the audiologist can provide to distinguish themselves in the changing landscape of hearing aid delivery systems.

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Audiology

NJSHA School Affairs Committee

This session will provide attendees with important up-to-date information on current hot topics; will address New Jersey Special Education Administrative Code (NJAC6A:14), specifically the areas of preschool eligibility, language evaluations/re-evaluations and clarification of Communication Impaired classification–all topics that we receive many questions about on a regular basis. There will be a presentation by our lobbyist addressing current legislation in Trenton potentially affecting the delivery of speech-language and audiology services in the schools. Our ASHA SEAL will provide an update. There will be an opportunity to learn about the wealth of information available on the new NJSHA website through a hands-on demonstration; and finally, a question and answer session will be provided to answer pressing questions from our attendees.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Summarize NJAC 6A:14 pertaining to language evaluations, re-evaluations, and preschool eligibility.
• Demonstrate knowledge of the current legislation that affects the provision of school-based services.
• Identify information available on the new NJSHA website.

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

NJSHA Healthcare Committee

Healthcare Committee

This interactive session will provide insight into legislation for speech-language pathology on the national and state level in such tumultuous times. Do you provide home health therapy services? Obtain current information regarding the Patient Driven Groupings Model (PDGM). Do you work in the skilled nursing facilities (SNFs)? Come and discuss how the Patient -Driven Payment Model (PDPM) is or is not working for you. ASHA still advocates for SLPs to report National Outcomes Measures (NOMS). How will this make you more powerful in demonstrating the effectiveness of the services you provide with the shrinking healthcare dollars, and meeting the demands of payers, administrators and consumers alike? What steps is NJSHA taking to make it easier for speech pathologists to perform Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluations for Swallowing in SNFs? Hear information from our Dysphagia Subcommittee. What is the present day status of providing services for early intervention? Bring questions of your own and information you want to share with your colleagues in the field of speech-language pathology.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe PDGM and PDPM
• Summarize how to report NOMS to ASHA and the benefits to doing so
• Identify how to provide services for EI
• Describe how NJSHA is supporting SLPs to perform the FEES

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Adult