Thursday, April 23

Convention Information |Friday Sessions |

Kayley Mayer, MAT, TOD; Alana D’Alessandro, MA, CCC-SLP, Sound Start Babies/Mountain Lakes EIP

This session will provide participants with educational materials to share with families regarding the importance of establishing routine, as well as research-based, language-focused strategies to approach and coach them to “close the gap” effectively. As each clinician’s caseload presents diverse family dynamics, parent education levels and cultural aspects to consider when developing treatment plans, the importance of individualized support will be highlighted. Participants will also be provided with take-away ideas and activities to enhance their work with children with hearing loss and language delays – birth to three and beyond.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify an early learning skill that relates to later literacy
• Demonstrate a research-based, language-focused strategy using a children’s book
• Generate activities using books in classroom, daycare setting or home

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Megan Brazas, MA, CCC-SLP, Northern Speech Services

Attendees will be introduced to a low tech exchange based communication system called the Core Vocabulary Exchange System™ (CVES). This session begins with an introduction to CVES™, including its features and functions and the different communication users who will benefit from CVES™. Case study examples highlight how the CVES™ can be used as a communication system or language teaching tool in therapy and routines.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe the benefits of removable and returnable icons to increase motor automaticity for language
• Explain how to select and implement core and fringe vocabulary words in a low-tech AAC system
• Discuss the relationship between core vocabulary, autism, and typical language development
• Understand how to implement at least two different data collection tools that align to core word acquisition

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Justin Osmond, O2 Events & Productions

What motivates you? What makes you tick? What gets you out of your comfort zone to experience the magic? This session will demonstrate how to find your “acorns”, your purpose as well as ways to overcome setbacks and failures to achieve greatness.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify ways to find your purpose
• List ways to to get out of your comfort zone and experience new things
• Summarize ways to bounce back from setbacks and failures

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Barbara Weinstein, PhD, CCC-A, Graduate Center, CUNY

Communication is a cornerstone of quality care in society in general and in health care settings in particular. In fact. effective communication allows individuals to participate more fully in their care. When a patient understands what is being said about his/her care, treatment and services, that patient is more likely to be activated to fulfill critical health care responsibilities. A major obstacle to effective communication in health care settings, age related hearing loss (ARHL) is increasing in prevalence and has been acknowledged to be a major public health problem. First and foremost, untreated hearing loss interferes with shared decision making and patient provider interactions. Further, the impacts range from cognitive and functional declines to diminished psychosocial well-being, activity limitations and social isolation. This session will provide a framework for understanding the downstream consequences of ARHL and a lens for understanding how to best identify persons with ARHL and to manage the negative impacts. The behavioral underpinnings of hearing health care interventions and outcomes will be reviewed. The session will conclude with an overview of the relationship between healthy aging and hearing health.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Discuss the framework for understanding the connection between age related hearing loss, reduced communicative effectiveness and social disengagement
• Apply behavioral theories to facilitate and optimize self management of challenges posed by age related hearing loss
• Counsel persons with ARHL regarding the continuum of hearing health care interventions and appropriateness as a function of clinical presentation

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:15 am–11:45 am (Session 10)

Anita Archer, PhD, Educational Consultant

To optimize our implementation of the science of reading to ensure that all students read accurately and fluently with good comprehension, we must draw from the science of instruction. In this session, Dr. Archer will discuss the critical variables in instruction: clear lesson purposes, structured lessons including demonstration, guided practice and checking for understanding, embedded formative assessment, active participation, effective feedback and judicious practice. When these elements are consistently and effectively used, learning results.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Outline content described in the Simple View of Reading
• List the instructional procedures directly related to learning
• List the types of practice related to learning

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:15 am–11:45 am (Session 11)

Stefanie LaManna, MS, CCC-SLP, Virtua Health; Karli Negrin, CCC-SLP, Nemours Alfred I DuPont Hospital for Children; Ryan Walker, MD, Advanced ENT
Marni Reisberg Memorial Program
Dysphagia in infants is a complex medical condition that is multifactorial and often influenced by neurological, respiratory and aerodigestive comorbidities. Risk factors for dysphagia are numerous and may include prematurity, congenital anomalies, airway abnormalities, cardiopulmonary disease, neurologic insult and chronic tube dependence. The pathophysiology of swallowing impairments are heterogeneous in this population given the context of multiple developing subsystems, especially in the premature infant, rendering clinical symptomatology unreliable during bedside assessment. Instrumental swallowing assessment, utilizing videofluoroscopy (VFSS) or endoscopy (FEES), provides valuable diagnostic information to guide management of dysphagia in the medically fragile infant, namely by identifying physiologic impairments and appropriate interventions to achieve swallowing integrity. Given the multifaceted nature of dysphagia in infants, interdisciplinary collaboration between physicians and speech-language pathologists with ongoing comprehensive assessment is paramount to promoting successful feeding outcomes. This session aims to discuss the diverse clinical symptomatology associated with dysphagic infants through review of case studies and highlight enhanced patient outcomes following an interdisciplinary team approach.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Define structural and physiologic deficits that can cause dysphagia in infants
• State clinical indications for use of instrumental evaluations to characterize swallowing physiology in infants
• Identify therapeutic interventions utilized during instrumentation to achieve swallowing integrity

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 2 of this session will take place 10:15 am–11:45 am (Session 12)

Barbara Schwerin Bohus, MS, CCC-SLP, Hackensack University Medical Center

Aging baby boomers are on the rise. The number of Americans age 65 and older will more than double by 2060 as compared to 2016. People with the diagnosis of dementia will continue to increase within the healthcare professionals’ caseloads. Are you aware that there are various types of dementia syndromes? Do you know how to conduct a person-centered assessment? It is essential to collaboratively form goals that are individually client driven when designing the plan of care. Memory aids, environmental modifications and technological support are key in providing services. Assessing for safe nutritional intake of foods and providing meal management techniques are an integral part of therapy. Helping families to deal with concomitant behavioral disturbances improves the quality of life within the home. Community outreach programs should be suggested with the client, family and caregiver in mind.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• List types of dementia syndromes
• Conduct a person-centered assessment
• Identify the team approach and community outreach programs
• Design individual functional goals using a collaborative approach

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Adult

Kayley Mayer, MAT, TOD, Sound Start Babies/Mountain Lakes EIP

Join us on an alphabetical journey through the world of early intervention! While specialized knowledge is necessary to address each child’s unique needs, there are universal best practices that can support early intervention practitioners in maximizing their effectiveness when providing services to young children and their families. In the 2017 fiscal year, children receiving services under Part C of IDEA in New Jersey accounted for 4.4 percent of babies and toddlers, birth to three years of age (APR Indicator 5 & 6 SFY18). This number has grown over the past five years, subsequently increasing the need for qualified professional to provide intervention during this critical window of opportunity (APR Indicator 6 Trend SFY 2018). During this session the presenter will introduce and discuss key terms related to this specialized population, as well as demonstrate techniques using case examples and videos. Attendees will be invited to take part in a dialogue related to the concepts. Challenges often experienced in coaching families will also be considered. This presentation provides fundamental knowledge and key concepts for new therapists entering the world of early intervention, or seasoned professionals looking to refresh and re-center.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify a challenge in family coaching and how to address it
• Apply a discussed strategy into their daily work with children and families
• Differentiate their instruction and intervention more effectively for children birth to three years of age

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Justin Osmond, O2 Events & Productions

It’s not always a lack of hearing… it’s a lack of hope. During this session, attendees will learn more about the challenges the presenter experienced and his solutions on how to develop more hope in a very degenerating world.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify ways to make life a mission… not an intermission
• Summarize how to accept yourself for ‘who’ you are and not ‘what’ you are
• Identify good healthy habits and discipline to impliment in order to keep us going

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Multi Interest

Barbara Weinstein, PhD, CCC-A, Graduate Center, CUNY

Communication is a cornerstone of quality care in society in general and in health care settings in particular. In fact. effective communication allows individuals to participate more fully in their care. When a patient understands what is being said about his/her care, treatment and services, that patient is more likely to be activated to fulfill critical health care responsibilities. A major obstacle to effective communication in health care settings, age related hearing loss (ARHL) is increasing in prevalence and has been acknowledged to be a major public health problem. First and foremost, untreated hearing loss interferes with shared decision making and patient provider interactions. Further, the impacts range from cognitive and functional declines to diminished psychosocial well-being, activity limitations and social isolation. This session will provide a framework for understanding the downstream consequences of ARHL and a lens for understanding how to best identify persons with ARHL and to manage the negative impacts. The behavioral underpinnings of hearing health care interventions and outcomes will be reviewed. The session will conclude with an overview of the relationship between healthy aging and hearing health.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Discuss the framework for understanding the connection between age related hearing loss, reduced communicative effectiveness and social disengagement
• Apply behavioral theories to facilitate and optimize self management of challenges posed by age related hearing loss
• Counsel persons with ARHL regarding the continuum of hearing health care interventions and appropriateness as a function of clinical presentation

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

Anita Archer, PhD, Educational Consultant

To optimize our implementation of the science of reading to ensure that all students read accurately and fluently with good comprehension, we must draw from the science of instruction. In this session, Dr. Archer will discuss the critical variables in instruction: clear lesson purposes, structured lessons including demonstration, guided practice and checking for understanding, embedded formative assessment, active participation, effective feedback and judicious practice. When these elements are consistently and effectively used, learning results.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Outline content described in the Simple View of Reading
• List the instructional procedures directly related to learning
• List the types of practice related to learning

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Stefanie LaManna, MS, CCC-SLP, Virtua Health; Karli Negrin, CCC-SLP, Nemours Alfred I DuPont Hospital for Children; Ryan Walker, MD, Advanced ENT

Dysphagia in infants is a complex medical condition that is multifactorial and often influenced by neurological, respiratory and aerodigestive comorbidities. Risk factors for dysphagia are numerous and may include prematurity, congenital anomalies, airway abnormalities, cardiopulmonary disease, neurologic insult and chronic tube dependence. The pathophysiology of swallowing impairments are heterogeneous in this population given the context of multiple developing subsystems, especially in the premature infant, rendering clinical symptomatology unreliable during bedside assessment. Instrumental swallowing assessment, utilizing videofluoroscopy (VFSS) or endoscopy (FEES), provides valuable diagnostic information to guide management of dysphagia in the medically fragile infant, namely by identifying physiologic impairments and appropriate interventions to achieve swallowing integrity. Given the multifaceted nature of dysphagia in infants, interdisciplinary collaboration between physicians and speech-language pathologists with ongoing comprehensive assessment is paramount to promoting successful feeding outcomes. This session aims to discuss the diverse clinical symptomatology associated with dysphagic infants through review of case studies and highlight enhanced patient outcomes following an interdisciplinary team approach.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Define structural and physiologic deficits that can cause dysphagia in infants
• State clinical indications for use of instrumental evaluations to characterize swallowing physiology in infants
• Identify therapeutic interventions utilized during instrumentation to achieve swallowing integrity

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Attendees will be introduced to a low tech exchange based communication system called the Core Vocabulary Exchange System™ (CVES). This session begins with an introduction to CVES™, including its features and functions and the different communication users who will benefit from CVES™. Case study examples highlight how the CVES™ can be used as a communication system or language teaching tool in therapy and routines.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe the benefits of removable and returnable icons to increase motor automaticity for language
• Explain how to select and implement core and fringe vocabulary words in a low-tech AAC system
• Discuss the relationship between core vocabulary, autism, and typical language development
• Understand how to implement at least two different data collection tools that align to core word acquisition

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 3 of this session will take place 1:15 pm–3:15 pm (Session 19)

Pat Dobbs, BA, Hearing Loss Evolution

The goal of this session is to enhance the experience of the professional who works with clients/patients/students with hearing loss. This session will addresses the lives of people with hearing loss and the challenges that they face in order to give you a better insight into their lives. Their primary challenge is comprehending speech in words, phrases, sentences etc. Comprehension is vital because without it, the hard-of-hearing (HOH)/deaf person might as well be living on a deserted island. There are less obvious challenges such as the shame and stigma associated with hearing loss which is very real. Also auditory fatigue, which explains why people with hearing loss are often exhausted and tend to isolate. The presenter will also discuss strategies that can help you (the professional) have the most successful session with your HOH/deaf patient/client/student, from a communication point of view. After all, if they haven’t clearly understood what you’ve said, then the session can’t be successful. It includes strategies for the hearing professional, but it also includes strategies for the person who has hearing loss.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify ways to improve your session with people who have hearing loss
• Identify ways to learn about the lives of people with hearing loss to better understand them and their motivations
• List strategies that will help to more effectively communicate with people who have hearing loss

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

Susane Dardeir, EdD, CCC-SLP, Elizabeth Public Schools, Kean University; Maria Rodriguez, SLPD , CCC-SLP, Elizabeth Public Schools

The number of culturally and linguistically diverse students within schools in New Jersey has been steadily increasing throughout the years. According to the American Community Survey, one in three families in New Jersey speak a language other than English in the home (US Census, 2018). Of the total number of New Jersey members, certificate holders, international affiliates and associates of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) were considered racial minorities, only seven percent self-identified as bilingual service providers (ASHA, 2019), which is much lower than the 27.6 percent of the total United States population that identifies as bilingual. As of school year 2012-2013, the number of public school students identified as English Language Learners (ELLs) had increased to 9.1 percent or approximately 4.4 million (National Center for Education Statistics, 2014). The purpose of this session is to highlight the significance of cultural and linguistic competency to improve student outcomes as well as SLP understanding and performance. Appropriate assessment measures incorporating formal and functional assessments will be reviewed and explained through case scenarios. Attendees will be equipped with legislative references and directives to prepare the school-based SLP with the necessary knowledge and tools to provide appropriate and ethical services to all students.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify federal, state and ASHA guidelines for best practices for assessment and treatment
• Discuss cultural and linguistic diversity issues within the school setting and their impact on service delivery
• Explain the significance of cultural competence for both monolingual and multilingual SLPs

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Leigh Carrico Mann, MS, CCC-SLP, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

As the specialty of gender-related treatment grows, so does the SLP role in this area. Sometimes this means voice training, which itself requires a specialized skill set, but we also need to be ready to address speech and language features, non-verbal communication and non-verbal phonatory behaviors (like coughing, sneezing, laughing). We have to be sensitive to the complex medical, social, emotional and economic factors that affect this population. School-based SLPs, whether they are providing voice therapy or not, are in a position to advocate for the well-being and safety of transgender or gender queer students. This has the potential to literally save lives. This ssession will provide instruction about the evaluation, treatment and documentation of gender diverse clients; where to find resources for professionals, clients and families; and suggestions for how to help build a comprehensive and inclusive culture and systems of care within institutions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Evaluate and create specific treatment goals for gender-related needs of transgender/gender diverse clients
• Identify at least three strategies to create an inclusive environment for LGBTQ+ staff and patients/clients
• Locate at least three specific organizations and sources of continuing education/support in this area of practice

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest

Stephen Gonzenbach, EdD, CCC-A/SLP, Retired

Relationships in professional practice with vendors and patients as well as business practices may place the audiologist or speech-language pathologist in an ethical conflict or dilemma. The participant in this session will explore the continuum of ethical behaviors from multiple perspectives to improve recognition of potential ethical conflicts. The participant will be provided with principles of the ethics of best practice and strategies to recognize and manage these potential ethical problems. Through case examples and integration with AAA and/or ASHA Codes of Ethics, participants will be expected to take part in discussion of varied ethical issues. Attendees will need to employ critical thinking and synthesis of multiple viewpoints to address ethical conflicts and dilemmas.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify at least two methods to assess an ethical dilemma
• Identify at least three barriers to ethical practice
• Identify the obvious and subtle influences of gifts, vendor relations and professional relationships as they effect patient care and treatment

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

Part 2 of this session will take place 3:15 pm–4:45 pm (Session 23)
This session qualifies for the ASHA ethics requirement.

Anita Archer, PhD, Educational Consultant

Whether you are working with elementary or secondary students, the ultimate aim is to have students read accurately and fluently with good understanding of what is being read. To ensure student success, the following big ideas must be addressed with research-validated practices before, during and after passage reading. Can students read the words accurately and fluently? Do students know the meaning of critical vocabulary? Do students have the necessary background knowledge for the passage? Do students use powerful practices to focus on and respond to the passage’s critical content? During this session the presenter will address each of these questions with current research. Attendees will leave with instructional procedures that you can put into action immediately.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Outline instructional practices before passage reading that will increase comprehension
• Outline instructional practices implemented during passage reading that will increase comprehension
• Outline instructional practices implemented after passage reading that will increase reading comprehension

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Part 2 of this session will take place 3:15 pm–4:45 pm (Session 24)

Megan Brazas, MA, CCC-SLP, Northern Speech Services

Attendees will be introduced to a low tech exchange based communication system called the Core Vocabulary Exchange System™ (CVES). This session begins with an introduction to CVES™, including its features and functions and the different communication users who will benefit from CVES™. Case study examples highlight how the CVES™ can be used as a communication system or language teaching tool in therapy and routines.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Describe the benefits of removable and returnable icons to increase motor automaticity for language
• Explain how to select and implement core and fringe vocabulary words in a low-tech AAC system
• Discuss the relationship between core vocabulary, autism, and typical language development
• Understand how to implement at least two different data collection tools that align to core word acquisition

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Come meet fellow university students to learn more about the benefits of NJSHA. Learn about the transition from student to professional, expectations and various work settings from seasoned professionals. Learn about the value of NJSHA, on how to improve your skills and increase contacts within the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology.

CEUs will not be available for this session

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: University

Lunch vouchers will be offered to university students who attend.

Session Sponsored by EBS Healthcare
Karen Bilbao, MA, CCC-SLP, EBS Healthcare

This session is designed to help learn methods of positively supporting student behavior in classroom/therapy settings. Working in collaborative groups, the participants will follow a basic protocol to analyze examples of their own professional behavior they wish to change. Using a similar, redirection protocol, they will analyze challenging student behavior. The protocols will guide the participants to discover antecedents and consequences, as well as possible functions of the behavior, and then collaboratively decide upon alternative, more desirable behaviors. Resources obtained from federal and state positive behavioral support networks will be presented for assistance.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Define behavior in observable terms
• Discover antecedents and consequences that are reinforcing undesirable behaviors
• Explore alternative, more acceptable behaviors that students can be exhibit in school

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Pediatric/School Based/University

Karen J. Kushla, ScD, CCC-A, FAAA, Lehman College, CUNY

In New Jersey, approximately 11 percent of adults have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, a chronic health condition that is caused by lack of or insensitivity to insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas. Insulin helps the body use glucose effectively. Of the two types of diabetes, Type 2 (aka adult-onset) is the most common due to increased body weight and lack exercise, whereas Type 1 (aka juvenile) diabetes is less common than Type 2 and requires insulin injections to manage effects of the disease. Both types of diabetes puts an individual at risk for a number of serious complications, namely blindness, cardiovascular disease and renal disease due to peripheral neuropathy. Other sequelae of diabetes may also include disorders of communication and balance control due to secondary factors of this chronic illness. This session will discuss the effect of Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus on communication in affected individuals. Attention will be paid to speech and language deficits along with deficits of hearing and balance.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Differentiate between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
• Discuss disorders of speech and language due to complications of diabetes mellitus
• Discuss disorders of hearing and balance due to complications of diabetes mellitus

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

Stephen Gonzenbach, EdD, CCC-A/SLP, Retired

Relationships in professional practice with vendors and patients as well as business practices may place the audiologist or speech-language pathologist in an ethical conflict or dilemma. The participant in this session will explore the continuum of ethical behaviors from multiple perspectives to improve recognition of potential ethical conflicts. The participant will be provided with principles of the ethics of best practice and strategies to recognize and manage these potential ethical problems. Through case examples and integration with AAA and/or ASHA Codes of Ethics, participants will be expected to take part in discussion of varied ethical issues. Attendees will need to employ critical thinking and synthesis of multiple viewpoints to address ethical conflicts and dilemmas.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify at least two methods to assess an ethical dilemma
• Identify at least three barriers to ethical practice
• Identify the obvious and subtle influences of gifts, vendor relations and professional relationships as they effect patient care and treatment

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest/Audiology

This session qualifies for the ASHA ethics requirement.

Anita Archer, PhD, Educational Consultant

Whether you are working with elementary or secondary students, the ultimate aim is to have students read accurately and fluently with good understanding of what is being read. To ensure student success, the following big ideas must be addressed with research-validated practices before, during and after passage reading. Can students read the words accurately and fluently? Do students know the meaning of critical vocabulary? Do students have the necessary background knowledge for the passage? Do students use powerful practices to focus on and respond to the passage’s critical content? During this session the presenter will address each of these questions with current research. Attendees will leave with instructional procedures that you can put into action immediately.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Outline instructional practices before passage reading that will increase comprehension
• Outline instructional practices implemented during passage reading that will increase comprehension
• Outline instructional practices implemented after passage reading that will increase reading comprehension

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Leigh Carrico Mann, MS, CCC-SLP, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

While the SLP’s typical role in end-of-life care is usually related to dysphagia, our communication expertise may be just as important when it comes to patient advocacy. The better we understand what is happening, the better we can use our clinical insight to counsel patients, family and staff throughout the dying process, and to make sure the patient’s voice and wishes are heard. This session will provide specific training about typical processes that occur before a person dies, including physical and emotional changes. We will look at dying in both pediatrics and adults, and explore the options offered by comfort care. We will consider how to approach conversations with staff/families/patients when rehab plans may be unrealistic and look at potential goals of care. Whether we practice in a medical or academic environment, death is the universal experience that will touch us all at some point. It requires both clinical prowess and emotional sensitivity to optimally address a dying person’s needs. We cannot count on the staff around us to direct the goals of care without our input, and we can help keep the patient and family central to ever-changing priorities.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify the signs that death may occur within months or weeks
• Name at least five disciplines that are crucial to supportive care at the end of life
• Identify at least three strategies to offer staff that support comfort care
• Expand ability to create palliative communication or swallow therapy goals, when clinically indicated

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Adult

Susane Dardeir, EdD, CCC-SLP, Elizabeth Public Schools, Kean University

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) highlights the need for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to understand the differentiating characteristics among various dialects. This skill is required to be able to differentiate between a dialectical difference and a speech sound disorder (SSD). Despite this, many children continue to be misdiagnosed as having an SSD when their speech differences are due to second language or regional influence. With the ever increasing number of multilingual children in the schools within the state of New Jersey, this has become a significant area needing greater attention. Formal assessment measures for articulation merely show whether an error is present. It is up to the individual SLP to utilize functional measures to make an accurate judgment. When the SLP has not been trained in functional assessment or has been trained to conduct informal testing procedures but does not know what to do with the results, it can cause great difficulty and incorrect assessment results. This program is aimed at giving SLPs a greater understanding to identify between dialect and SSD, help them to understand the importance of functional assessment measures, and provide them with the tools needed to make appropriate assessment decisions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Summarize the importance of functional measures in assessment with multilingual children
• Identify personal biases that impact ability to discern between dialectical difference and articulation disorder in multilingual children
• Discuss cultural and linguistic differences that need to be taken into consideration during assessment

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Justin Osmond, O2 Events & Production

The focus of Mr. Osmond’s message is to share with the world the challenges and strengths that come from coping with his own hearing loss, and then relating and resonating this to the many various hardships and challenges that others may be facing. Through his personal stories, music and experiences, Mr. Osmond will share with the attendees the challenges and strengths that result from a hearing loss and a first-hand perspective of the everyday issues that hard-of-hearing individuals face. He will address the social-emotional challenges, including how to address feelings of inadequacy and fear of people and consequences. He will provide insight on the attitudes often demonstrated by the general public towards individuals with a hearing loss. Attendees will gain an understanding of how lack of hope and motivation in individuals with a hearing loss can be more de-habilitating than the loss of hearing itself. Mr. Osmond’s message offers hope to the hopeless, activation to the passive, clarity to the indecisive, motivation to the fence sitters and a burning desire for everyone to tackle not just the low hanging fruit, but to own the whole tree.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…
• Identify the personal challenges and strengths associated with hearing loss and relating this to different various challenges others face
• Describe strategies and how to motivate everyone to focus on strengths rather than limitations
• Identify ways to create a new action plan to achieve goals and advance in personal and professional lives
• Apply strategies and techniques to address the individual’s social-emotional challenges and increase everyday functioning

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Multi-Interest