Thursday, April 29

Convention InformationWednesday Sessions | Friday SessionsSaturday Sessions | Posters | Convention Schedule At-A-Glance

SESSION KEY:

All sessions will be available LIVE on the date and time noted.
Indicated sessions will also be recorded and available on-demand May 3-17, 2021.

All sessions are noted in eastern time zone

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Monmouth University

This session will provide an overview of the different types of fluency disorders SLPs may encounter in clients of all ages. Disorders covered will include stuttering, covert stuttering, cluttering and atypical disfluency. Assessment and differential diagnosis will be covered. Myths and pitfalls related to assessment of all disfluencies will be covered. Critically thinking through everyday problems in diagnosis and assessment will be presented, using real pediatric cases as examples. This session will serve as a foundation course to Part 2: Teen and Adult Issues and Fluency Plus.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Define stuttering, cluttering and atypical disfluency
  • Name one strategy for differential diagnosis of cluttering from stuttering and atypical disfluency
  • Name one strategy for differential diagnosis of covert stuttering, language disorder, English Language Learning from cluttering

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based/Adult

Allison Boyer, CCC-SLP, St. Mary’s General Hospital; LisaRose McCabe, SLPD, Fox Rehabilitation, GRS, HMH, Kean University

When a client/patient transitions from one facility to another or to a different level of care we, the speech-language
pathologist (SLP) on the care team, complete appropriate documentation and then what? There has been a push within the healthcare community for patient centered care in which the clinician builds a trusting relationship with the client
through dyadic communication and decision making. However, have we formulated a consistent means to share information from one SLP to another SLP along the continuum of care? Or do we have to keep reinventing the wheel by starting from the ground up at each level of care? A thorough exploration of the ethics, realities, efficacy and methods is vital in curating a communication process which weaves interprofessional collaboration strategies and increased buy-in from SLPs from multiple parts of the healthcare continuum. An exploration of the literature from our pharmacy, nursing and teaching colleagues will serve to build a foundation to ameliorate patient quality of care through collaboration rather than competition. The increasing number of older adults receiving SLP services from multiple providers in a short period of time lends itself to investigating the who, what, when, where, why and how of intraprofessional communication and collaboration as a means of providing the highest level of care for our clients.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Identify strategies to increase efficacious intraprofessional collaboration.
  • Identify current collaborative models used in interprofessional communication and apply knowledge
    to intraprofessional situations.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the ethics and HIPPA concerns in creating an intraprofessional
    communication plan.

 

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Adult

Catherine Fredericks MA, CCC-SLP ATP/CAS, Wayne Board of Education; Barbra Seltzer, MS, CCC-SLP, ATP, Access Communication and Therapy

Although awareness and use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) has been on the rise, many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are unclear regarding who to refer for an AAC evaluation, who is best qualified to perform an AAC evaluation and how to start planning and implementing therapy with an AAC user. This session seeks to answer some of the questions which face many practicing SLPs. These include: Who is a candidate for AAC? Who is qualified to perform an evaluation? Who is responsible for funding? What should an AAC Evaluation include? What system should be recommended? What is the best implementation strategy? What vocabulary should be introduced? Who is responsible for implementing AAC? Where should AAC be used? Why use an AAC system with students who are verbal? How can training for communication partners be obtained? How do you inspire interaction with communication partners? These topics and more will be addressed during this session. Resources for further information will be provided.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Describe referral criteria for an AAC Evaluation.
  • Identify three common myths regarding use of AAC.
  • Discuss who is best qualified to evaluate someone for use of AAC.
  • Understand and be able to use the strategies of Aided Language Input and Descriptive Teaching.
  • Understand the meaning and value of core vocabulary, fringe vocabulary and robust vocabulary.

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Brian Taylor, AuD, Signia; Carolyn Smaka, AuD, continued; Debra Abel, AuD, Audigy

This session will provide a panel discussion among industry influencers and experts in audiology. This will be a conversation about what’s new in audiologic service delivery, the hearing care industry and current issues relevant to clinical practice. We will discuss the challenges facing the profession of audiology and how to approach the ever-changing landscape of hearing care service delivery. Topics will include patient-centered care, a service versus product delivery model and the value of audiologist care across the full scope of hearing and balance treatment services. There will be discussion of current hearing aid technology, OTC, professional practices and more, with opportunity to address the panel and ask questions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Summarize patient-centered care approaches for evaluating individuals with hearing loss and fitting amplification.
  • Discuss new approaches to face current challenges in amplification technology delivery, including hearing aids and OTCs.
  • Identify other professional services the audiologist can provide to distinguish themselves in the changing landscape of hearing aid delivery systems.

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Audiology

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, Monmouth University

This session will examine the treatment of stuttering, cluttering and atypical disfluencies in teens and adults. Critically thinking through everyday problems in treatment will be presented, using real cases as examples. Emphasis will be upon using the skills and evidence we have, considering all client needs, and making logical and practical choices. Critically thinking through everyday problems in diagnosis and assessment will be presented, using real teen and adult cases as examples.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Name one strategy for working with stuttering in teens and adults
  • Name one strategy for working with cluttering in teens and adults
  • Name one strategy for choosing a practical treatment path when working with teens and adults with disfluency

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Pediatric/School Based/Adult

Emily Doll, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, Colonial IU 20

Selective mutism (SM) is an anxiety disorder that profoundly affects social/pragmatic language skills and falls under the speech-language pathologist’s (SLP’s) scope of practice. Though typically diagnosed by a psychiatrist or psychologist, SM is a complex disorder that demands involvement from a transdiciplinary team of professionals in order to be treated successfully. Children with SM are at a significant disadvantage compared to peers in terms of social and academic functioning. Broadly, SM prevents the child from engaging in meaningful conversational exchanges with adults and peers and thus, from learning vital social norms and skills, as well as vocabulary and language structure. Academically, children experience limited or even nonexistent social interactions with peers and teachers, leading to limited involvement in school routines and activities and even delays in oral reading and word attack skills. Because SLPs are well-versed in components of language development and complexity, as well as treatment methods for teaching social language skills and functional communication, SLPs bring a wealth of relevant knowledge to the table and have much to contribute to the treatment of SM. As such, it is vital that SLPs have a working understanding of how to treat SM in an intentional and evidence-based manner. The session will discuss characteristics of SM, review the role of the SLP, provide assessment strategies, review important factors to consider in planning treatment and provide practical suggestions of activities to use in therapy sessions.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Describe characteristics of selective mutism and the speech-language pathologist’s role in assessing and treating selective mutism.
  • Plan and carry out an effective assessment protocol to determine the student’s strengths and areas of need.
  • Create and implement an intentional and evidence-based treatment program tailored to the student’s individual needs.

 

Level of Learning: Introductory | Track: Pediatric/School Based

Darya Hinman, SLPD, CCC-SLP, Kean University, Speech and Hearing Associates; Sarah Patten, PhD, CCC-SLP, Kean University

This presentation is for speech-language pathologists that have undertaken, or are interested in pursuing, clinical supervisory roles. In this session, various areas of clinical education will be discussed and addressed. The presenters will introduce various cognitive models as they relate and apply to the provision of clinical education. Andragogy (the teaching of adult learners) will be introduced, expanded upon and applied to the roles of both the clinical educator and supervisee. Finally, methods supporting the establishment of effective working relationships between clinical educators and supervisees will be explored. The material presented in this session will add to the information available to clinical educators in order to further improve their own experiences within this role and the learning of their supervisees.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to…

  • Apply components of one cognitive model to clinical supervision.
  • Identify two components of cognitive models as they relate and support a clinical supervisory relationship.
  • Define three ways to establish a culturally appropriate working relationship with a supervisees.

 

Time-Ordered Agenda:

  • 15 minutes – Introduction/Overview
  • 30 minutes – Introduction to cognitive models
  • 15 minutes – Introduction to adult learning
  • 15 minutes – Activity regarding learning styles
  • 15 minutes – Discussion on outcomes of the activity
  • 20 minutes – Establishing working relationships
  • 10 minutes – Questions

 

Level of Learning: Intermediate | Track: Multi-Interest